2011年4月TIMEを読む会
(1)singularity(2)How Germany Became the China of Europe

2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal
Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011
By Lev Grossman
sin・gu・lar・i・ty
n:The moment when technological change becomes so rapid and profound, it represents a rupture in the fabric of human history

On Feb. 15, 1965, a diffident but self-possessed high school student named Raymond Kurzweil appeared as a guest on a game show called I've Got a Secret. He was introduced by the host, Steve Allen, then he played a short musical composition on a piano. The idea was that Kurzweil was hiding an unusual fact and the panelists — they included a comedian and a former Miss America — had to guess what it was.

On the show (see the clip on YouTube), the beauty queen did a good job of grilling Kurzweil, but the comedian got the win: the music was composed by a computer. Kurzweil got $200.

Kurzweil then demonstrated the computer, which he built himself — a desk-size affair with loudly clacking relays, hooked up to a typewriter. The panelists were pretty blasé about it; they were more impressed by Kurzweil's age than by anything he'd actually done. They were ready to move on to Mrs. Chester Loney of Rough and Ready, Calif., whose secret was that she'd been President Lyndon Johnson's first-grade teacher.

But Kurzweil would spend much of the rest of his career working out what his demonstration meant. Creating a work of art is one of those activities we reserve for humans and humans only. It's an act of self-expression; you're not supposed to be able to do it if you don't have a self. To see creativity, the exclusive domain of humans, usurped by a computer built by a 17-year-old is to watch a line blur that cannot be unblurred, the line between organic intelligence and artificial intelligence.

That was Kurzweil's real secret, and back in 1965 nobody guessed it. Maybe not even him, not yet. But now, 46 years later, Kurzweil believes that we're approaching a moment when computers will become intelligent, and not just intelligent but more intelligent than humans. When that happens, humanity — our bodies, our minds, our civilization — will be completely and irreversibly transformed. He believes that this moment is not only inevitable but imminent. According to his calculations, the end of human civilization as we know it is about 35 years away.

Computers are getting faster. Everybody knows that. Also, computers are getting faster faster — that is, the rate at which they're getting faster is increasing.

True? True.

So if computers are getting so much faster, so incredibly fast, there might conceivably come a moment when they are capable of something comparable to human intelligence. Artificial intelligence. All that horsepower could be put in the service of emulating whatever it is our brains are doing when they create consciousness — not just doing arithmetic very quickly or composing piano music but also driving cars, writing books, making ethical decisions, appreciating fancy paintings, making witty observations at cocktail parties.

If you can swallow that idea, and Kurzweil and a lot of other very smart people can, then all bets are off. From that point on, there's no reason to think computers would stop getting more powerful. They would keep on developing until they were far more intelligent than we are. Their rate of development would also continue to increase, because they would take over their own development from their slower-thinking human creators. Imagine a computer scientist that was itself a super-intelligent computer. It would work incredibly quickly. It could draw on huge amounts of data effortlessly. It wouldn't even take breaks to play Farmville.

Probably. It's impossible to predict the behavior of these smarter-than-human intelligences with which (with whom?) we might one day share the planet, because if you could, you'd be as smart as they would be. But there are a lot of theories about it. Maybe we'll merge with them to become super-intelligent cyborgs, using computers to extend our intellectual abilities the same way that cars and planes extend our physical abilities. Maybe the artificial intelligences will help us treat the effects of old age and prolong our life spans indefinitely. Maybe we'll scan our consciousnesses into computers and live inside them as software, forever, virtually. Maybe the computers will turn on humanity and annihilate us. The one thing all these theories have in common is the transformation of our species into something that is no longer recognizable as such to humanity circa 2011. This transformation has a name: the Singularity.

The difficult thing to keep sight of when you're talking about the Singularity is that even though it sounds like science fiction, it isn't, no more than a weather forecast is science fiction. It's not a fringe idea; it's a serious hypothesis about the future of life on Earth. There's an intellectual gag reflex that kicks in anytime you try to swallow an idea that involves super-intelligent immortal cyborgs, but suppress it if you can, because while the Singularity appears to be, on the face of it, preposterous, it's an idea that rewards sober, careful evaluation.

People are spending a lot of money trying to understand it. The three-year-old Singularity University, which offers inter-disciplinary courses of study for graduate students and executives, is hosted by NASA. Google was a founding sponsor; its CEO and co-founder Larry Page spoke there last year. People are attracted to the Singularity for the shock value, like an intellectual freak show, but they stay because there's more to it than they expected. And of course, in the event that it turns out to be real, it will be the most important thing to happen to human beings since the invention of language.

The Singularity isn't a wholly new idea, just newish. In 1965 the British mathematician I.J. Good described something he called an "intelligence explosion":

Let an ultraintelligent machine be defined as a machine that can far surpass all the intellectual activities of any man however clever. Since the design of machines is one of these intellectual activities, an ultraintelligent machine could design even better machines; there would then unquestionably be an "intelligence explosion," and the intelligence of man would be left far behind. Thus the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make.

The word singularity is borrowed from astrophysics: it refers to a point in space-time — for example, inside a black hole — at which the rules of ordinary physics do not apply. In the 1980s the science-fiction novelist Vernor Vinge attached it to Good's intelligence-explosion scenario. At a NASA symposium in 1993, Vinge announced that "within 30 years, we will have the technological means to create super-human intelligence. Shortly after, the human era will be ended."

By that time Kurzweil was thinking about the Singularity too. He'd been busy since his appearance on I've Got a Secret. He'd made several fortunes as an engineer and inventor; he founded and then sold his first software company while he was still at MIT. He went on to build the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind — Stevie Wonder was customer No. 1 — and made innovations in a range of technical fields, including music synthesizers and speech recognition. He holds 39 patents and 19 honorary doctorates. In 1999 President Bill Clinton awarded him the National Medal of Technology.

But Kurzweil was also pursuing a parallel career as a futurist: he has been publishing his thoughts about the future of human and machine-kind for 20 years, most recently in The Singularity Is Near, which was a best seller when it came out in 2005. A documentary by the same name, starring Kurzweil, Tony Robbins and Alan Dershowitz, among others, was released in January. (Kurzweil is actually the subject of two current documentaries. The other one, less authorized but more informative, is called The Transcendent Man.) Bill Gates has called him "the best person I know at predicting the future of artificial intelligence."(See the world's most influential people in the 2010 TIME 100.)

In real life, the transcendent man is an unimposing figure who could pass for Woody Allen's even nerdier younger brother. Kurzweil grew up in Queens, N.Y., and you can still hear a trace of it in his voice. Now 62, he speaks with the soft, almost hypnotic calm of someone who gives 60 public lectures a year. As the Singularity's most visible champion, he has heard all the questions and faced down the incredulity many, many times before. He's good-natured about it. His manner is almost apologetic: I wish I could bring you less exciting news of the future, but I've looked at the numbers, and this is what they say, so what else can I tell you?

Kurzweil's interest in humanity's cyborganic destiny began about 1980 largely as a practical matter. He needed ways to measure and track the pace of technological progress. Even great inventions can fail if they arrive before their time, and he wanted to make sure that when he released his, the timing was right. "Even at that time, technology was moving quickly enough that the world was going to be different by the time you finished a project," he says. "So it's like skeet shooting — you can't shoot at the target." He knew about Moore's law, of course, which states that the number of transistors you can put on a microchip doubles about every two years. It's a surprisingly reliable rule of thumb. Kurzweil tried plotting a slightly different curve: the change over time in the amount of computing power, measured in MIPS (millions of instructions per second), that you can buy for $1,000.

As it turned out, Kurzweil's numbers looked a lot like Moore's. They doubled every couple of years. Drawn as graphs, they both made exponential curves, with their value increasing by multiples of two instead of by regular increments in a straight line. The curves held eerily steady, even when Kurzweil extended his backward through the decades of pretransistor computing technologies like relays and vacuum tubes, all the way back to 1900. (Comment on this story.)

Kurzweil then ran the numbers on a whole bunch of other key technological indexes — the falling cost of manufacturing transistors, the rising clock speed of microprocessors, the plummeting price of dynamic RAM. He looked even further afield at trends in biotech and beyond — the falling cost of sequencing DNA and of wireless data service and the rising numbers of Internet hosts and nanotechnology patents. He kept finding the same thing: exponentially accelerating progress. "It's really amazing how smooth these trajectories are," he says. "Through thick and thin, war and peace, boom times and recessions." Kurzweil calls it the law of accelerating returns: technological progress happens exponentially, not linearly.

Then he extended the curves into the future, and the growth they predicted was so phenomenal, it created cognitive resistance in his mind. Exponential curves start slowly, then rocket skyward toward infinity. According to Kurzweil, we're not evolved to think in terms of exponential growth. "It's not intuitive. Our built-in predictors are linear. When we're trying to avoid an animal, we pick the linear prediction of where it's going to be in 20 seconds and what to do about it. That is actually hardwired in our brains."

Here's what the exponential curves told him. We will successfully reverse-engineer the human brain by the mid-2020s. By the end of that decade, computers will be capable of human-level intelligence. Kurzweil puts the date of the Singularity — never say he's not conservative — at 2045. In that year, he estimates, given the vast increases in computing power and the vast reductions in the cost of same, the quantity of artificial intelligence created will be about a billion times the sum of all the human intelligence that exists today.

The Singularity isn't just an idea. it attracts people, and those people feel a bond with one another. Together they form a movement, a subculture; Kurzweil calls it a community. Once you decide to take the Singularity seriously, you will find that you have become part of a small but intense and globally distributed hive of like-minded thinkers known as Singularitarians.

Not all of them are Kurzweilians, not by a long chalk. There's room inside Singularitarianism for considerable diversity of opinion about what the Singularity means and when and how it will or won't happen. But Singularitarians share a worldview. They think in terms of deep time, they believe in the power of technology to shape history, they have little interest in the conventional wisdom about anything, and they cannot believe you're walking around living your life and watching TV as if the artificial-intelligence revolution were not about to erupt and change absolutely everything. They have no fear of sounding ridiculous; your ordinary citizen's distaste for apparently absurd ideas is just an example of irrational bias, and Singularitarians have no truck with irrationality. When you enter their mind-space you pass through an extreme gradient in worldview, a hard ontological shear that separates Singularitarians from the common run of humanity. Expect turbulence.

In addition to the Singularity University, which Kurzweil co-founded, there's also a Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence, based in San Francisco. It counts among its advisers Peter Thiel, a former CEO of PayPal and an early investor in Facebook. The institute holds an annual conference called the Singularity Summit. (Kurzweil co-founded that too.) Because of the highly interdisciplinary nature of Singularity theory, it attracts a diverse crowd. Artificial intelligence is the main event, but the sessions also cover the galloping progress of, among other fields, genetics and nanotechnology.

At the 2010 summit, which took place in August in San Francisco, there were not just computer scientists but also psychologists, neuroscientists, nanotechnologists, molecular biologists, a specialist in wearable computers, a professor of emergency medicine, an expert on cognition in gray parrots and the professional magician and debunker James "the Amazing" Randi. The atmosphere was a curious blend of Davos and UFO convention. Proponents of seasteading — the practice, so far mostly theoretical, of establishing politically autonomous floating communities in international waters — handed out pamphlets. An android chatted with visitors in one corner.

After artificial intelligence, the most talked-about topic at the 2010 summit was life extension. Biological boundaries that most people think of as permanent and inevitable Singularitarians see as merely intractable but solvable problems. Death is one of them. Old age is an illness like any other, and what do you do with illnesses? You cure them. Like a lot of Singularitarian ideas, it sounds funny at first, but the closer you get to it, the less funny it seems. It's not just wishful thinking; there's actual science going on here.

For example, it's well known that one cause of the physical degeneration associated with aging involves telomeres, which are segments of DNA found at the ends of chromosomes. Every time a cell divides, its telomeres get shorter, and once a cell runs out of telomeres, it can't reproduce anymore and dies. But there's an enzyme called telomerase that reverses this process; it's one of the reasons cancer cells live so long. So why not treat regular non-cancerous cells with telomerase? In November, researchers at Harvard Medical School announced in Nature that they had done just that. They administered telomerase to a group of mice suffering from age-related degeneration. The damage went away. The mice didn't just get better; they got younger.

Aubrey de Grey is one of the world's best-known life-extension researchers and a Singularity Summit veteran. A British biologist with a doctorate from Cambridge and a famously formidable beard, de Grey runs a foundation called SENS, or Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence. He views aging as a process of accumulating damage, which he has divided into seven categories, each of which he hopes to one day address using regenerative medicine. "People have begun to realize that the view of aging being something immutable — rather like the heat death of the universe — is simply ridiculous," he says. "It's just childish. The human body is a machine that has a bunch of functions, and it accumulates various types of damage as a side effect of the normal function of the machine. Therefore in principal that damage can be repaired periodically. This is why we have vintage cars. It's really just a matter of paying attention. The whole of medicine consists of messing about with what looks pretty inevitable until you figure out how to make it not inevitable."

Kurzweil takes life extension seriously too. His father, with whom he was very close, died of heart disease at 58. Kurzweil inherited his father's genetic predisposition; he also developed Type 2 diabetes when he was 35. Working with Terry Grossman, a doctor who specializes in longevity medicine, Kurzweil has published two books on his own approach to life extension, which involves taking up to 200 pills and supplements a day. He says his diabetes is essentially cured, and although he's 62 years old from a chronological perspective, he estimates that his biological age is about 20 years younger.

But his goal differs slightly from de Grey's. For Kurzweil, it's not so much about staying healthy as long as possible; it's about staying alive until the Singularity. It's an attempted handoff. Once hyper-intelligent artificial intelligences arise, armed with advanced nanotechnology, they'll really be able to wrestle with the vastly complex, systemic problems associated with aging in humans. Alternatively, by then we'll be able to transfer our minds to sturdier vessels such as computers and robots. He and many other Singularitarians take seriously the proposition that many people who are alive today will wind up being functionally immortal.

It's an idea that's radical and ancient at the same time. In "Sailing to Byzantium," W.B. Yeats describes mankind's fleshly predicament as a soul fastened to a dying animal. Why not unfasten it and fasten it to an immortal robot instead? But Kurzweil finds that life extension produces even more resistance in his audiences than his exponential growth curves. "There are people who can accept computers being more intelligent than people," he says. "But the idea of significant changes to human longevity — that seems to be particularly controversial. People invested a lot of personal effort into certain philosophies dealing with the issue of life and death. I mean, that's the major reason we have religion." (See the top 10 medical breakthroughs of 2010.)

Of course, a lot of people think the Singularity is nonsense — a fantasy, wishful thinking, a Silicon Valley version of the Evangelical story of the Rapture, spun by a man who earns his living making outrageous claims and backing them up with pseudoscience. Most of the serious critics focus on the question of whether a computer can truly become intelligent.

The entire field of artificial intelligence, or AI, is devoted to this question. But AI doesn't currently produce the kind of intelligence we associate with humans or even with talking computers in movies — HAL or C3PO or Data. Actual AIs tend to be able to master only one highly specific domain, like interpreting search queries or playing chess. They operate within an extremely specific frame of reference. They don't make conversation at parties. They're intelligent, but only if you define intelligence in a vanishingly narrow way. The kind of intelligence Kurzweil is talking about, which is called strong AI or artificial general intelligence, doesn't exist yet.

Why not? Obviously we're still waiting on all that exponentially growing computing power to get here. But it's also possible that there are things going on in our brains that can't be duplicated electronically no matter how many MIPS you throw at them. The neurochemical architecture that generates the ephemeral chaos we know as human consciousness may just be too complex and analog to replicate in digital silicon. The biologist Dennis Bray was one of the few voices of dissent at last summer's Singularity Summit. "Although biological components act in ways that are comparable to those in electronic circuits," he argued, in a talk titled "What Cells Can Do That Robots Can't," "they are set apart by the huge number of different states they can adopt. Multiple biochemical processes create chemical modifications of protein molecules, further diversified by association with distinct structures at defined locations of a cell. The resulting combinatorial explosion of states endows living systems with an almost infinite capacity to store information regarding past and present conditions and a unique capacity to prepare for future events." That makes the ones and zeros that computers trade in look pretty crude. (See how to live 100 years.)

Underlying the practical challenges are a host of philosophical ones. Suppose we did create a computer that talked and acted in a way that was indistinguishable from a human being — in other words, a computer that could pass the Turing test. (Very loosely speaking, such a computer would be able to pass as human in a blind test.) Would that mean that the computer was sentient, the way a human being is? Or would it just be an extremely sophisticated but essentially mechanical automaton without the mysterious spark of consciousness — a machine with no ghost in it? And how would we know?

Even if you grant that the Singularity is plausible, you're still staring at a thicket of unanswerable questions. If I can scan my consciousness into a computer, am I still me? What are the geopolitics and the socioeconomics of the Singularity? Who decides who gets to be immortal? Who draws the line between sentient and nonsentient? And as we approach immortality, omniscience and omnipotence, will our lives still have meaning? By beating death, will we have lost our essential humanity?

Kurzweil admits that there's a fundamental level of risk associated with the Singularity that's impossible to refine away, simply because we don't know what a highly advanced artificial intelligence, finding itself a newly created inhabitant of the planet Earth, would choose to do. It might not feel like competing with us for resources. One of the goals of the Singularity Institute is to make sure not just that artificial intelligence develops but also that the AI is friendly. You don't have to be a super-intelligent cyborg to understand that introducing a superior life-form into your own biosphere is a basic Darwinian error.

If the Singularity is coming, these questions are going to get answers whether we like it or not, and Kurzweil thinks that trying to put off the Singularity by banning technologies is not only impossible but also unethical and probably dangerous. "It would require a totalitarian system to implement such a ban," he says. "It wouldn't work. It would just drive these technologies underground, where the responsible scientists who we're counting on to create the defenses would not have easy access to the tools."

Kurzweil is an almost inhumanly patient and thorough debater. He relishes it. He's tireless in hunting down his critics so that he can respond to them, point by point, carefully and in detail.

Take the question of whether computers can replicate the biochemical complexity of an organic brain. Kurzweil yields no ground there whatsoever. He does not see any fundamental difference between flesh and silicon that would prevent the latter from thinking. He defies biologists to come up with a neurological mechanism that could not be modeled or at least matched in power and flexibility by software running on a computer. He refuses to fall on his knees before the mystery of the human brain. "Generally speaking," he says, "the core of a disagreement I'll have with a critic is, they'll say, Oh, Kurzweil is underestimating the complexity of reverse-engineering of the human brain or the complexity of biology. But I don't believe I'm underestimating the challenge. I think they're underestimating the power of exponential growth."

This position doesn't make Kurzweil an outlier, at least among Singularitarians. Plenty of people make more-extreme predictions. Since 2005 the neuroscientist Henry Markram has been running an ambitious initiative at the Brain Mind Institute of the Ecole Polytechnique in Lausanne, Switzerland. It's called the Blue Brain project, and it's an attempt to create a neuron-by-neuron simulation of a mammalian brain, using IBM's Blue Gene super-computer. So far, Markram's team has managed to simulate one neocortical column from a rat's brain, which contains about 10,000 neurons. Markram has said that he hopes to have a complete virtual human brain up and running in 10 years. (Even Kurzweil sniffs at this. If it worked, he points out, you'd then have to educate the brain, and who knows how long that would take?)

By definition, the future beyond the Singularity is not knowable by our linear, chemical, animal brains, but Kurzweil is teeming with theories about it. He positively flogs himself to think bigger and bigger; you can see him kicking against the confines of his aging organic hardware. "When people look at the implications of ongoing exponential growth, it gets harder and harder to accept," he says. "So you get people who really accept, yes, things are progressing exponentially, but they fall off the horse at some point because the implications are too fantastic. I've tried to push myself to really look."

In Kurzweil's future, biotechnology and nanotechnology give us the power to manipulate our bodies and the world around us at will, at the molecular level. Progress hyperaccelerates, and every hour brings a century's worth of scientific breakthroughs. We ditch Darwin and take charge of our own evolution. The human genome becomes just so much code to be bug-tested and optimized and, if necessary, rewritten. Indefinite life extension becomes a reality; people die only if they choose to. Death loses its sting once and for all. Kurzweil hopes to bring his dead father back to life.

We can scan our consciousnesses into computers and enter a virtual existence or swap our bodies for immortal robots and light out for the edges of space as intergalactic godlings. Within a matter of centuries, human intelligence will have re-engineered and saturated all the matter in the universe. This is, Kurzweil believes, our destiny as a species. (See the costs of living a long life.)

Or it isn't. When the big questions get answered, a lot of the action will happen where no one can see it, deep inside the black silicon brains of the computers, which will either bloom bit by bit into conscious minds or just continue in ever more brilliant and powerful iterations of nonsentience.

But as for the minor questions, they're already being decided all around us and in plain sight. The more you read about the Singularity, the more you start to see it peeking out at you, coyly, from unexpected directions. Five years ago we didn't have 600 million humans carrying out their social lives over a single electronic network. Now we have Facebook. Five years ago you didn't see people double-checking what they were saying and where they were going, even as they were saying it and going there, using handheld network-enabled digital prosthetics. Now we have iPhones. Is it an unimaginable step to take the iPhones out of our hands and put them into our skulls?

Already 30,000 patients with Parkinson's disease have neural implants. Google is experimenting with computers that can drive cars. There are more than 2,000 robots fighting in Afghanistan alongside the human troops. This month a game show will once again figure in the history of artificial intelligence, but this time the computer will be the guest: an IBM super-computer nicknamed Watson will compete on Jeopardy! Watson runs on 90 servers and takes up an entire room, and in a practice match in January it finished ahead of two former champions, Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter. It got every question it answered right, but much more important, it didn't need help understanding the questions (or, strictly speaking, the answers), which were phrased in plain English. Watson isn't strong AI, but if strong AI happens, it will arrive gradually, bit by bit, and this will have been one of the bits.

A hundred years from now, Kurzweil and de Grey and the others could be the 22nd century's answer to the Founding Fathers — except unlike the Founding Fathers, they'll still be alive to get credit — or their ideas could look as hilariously retro and dated as Disney's Tomorrowland. Nothing gets old as fast as the future.

But even if they're dead wrong about the future, they're right about the present. They're taking the long view and looking at the big picture. You may reject every specific article of the Singularitarian charter, but you should admire Kurzweil for taking the future seriously. Singularitarianism is grounded in the idea that change is real and that humanity is in charge of its own fate and that history might not be as simple as one damn thing after another. Kurzweil likes to point out that your average cell phone is about a millionth the size of, a millionth the price of and a thousand times more powerful than the computer he had at MIT 40 years ago. Flip that forward 40 years and what does the world look like? If you really want to figure that out, you have to think very, very far outside the box. Or maybe you have to think further inside it than anyone ever has before.


本文に出てくるイェイツの詩の一部です。

From "Yeats - Sailing To Byzantium"

≪III≫

O sages standing in God's holy fire

As in the gold mosaic of a wall,

Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,

And be the singing-masters of my soul.

Consume my heart away; sick with desire

And fastened to a dying animal

It knows not what it is; and gather me

Into the artifice of eternity.


壁に嵌められた黄金のモザイクのような

神の火につつまれた聖者たちよ

その火のなかから螺旋を描きながら飛び出し

わたしに魂の歌を教えてほしい

わたしの心を焼き尽くしてほしい

欲望に燃え命に執着するわたしの心を

それは自分のなんなるかを知らないゆえ

永遠の芸術品へと鍛えなおしてほしい

訳:壺齋散人

2045年 : 人類が不滅の生命を獲得する年
sin・gu・lar・i・ty (名詞): シンギュラリティー / 特異点
テクノロジーの変化が急激で深遠になった瞬間、人類史の基本的構造に断絶を生じること

1965年2月15日、内気で沈着な高校生レイモンド・カーツワイルはゲームショー「私の秘密」のゲストとして登場した。司会者のスティーブ・アレンに紹介されて、彼は短い曲をピアノ演奏した。番組の趣旨は、カーツワイルは珍しい秘密を持っていて、コメディアンや元ビューティクイーンなどのパネリストがその秘密をあてるということだった。  

そのショーでは(YouTubeで見ることができる)、カーツワイルを質問攻めにしたビューティクイーンはなかなかいい線をいったが、コメディアンが勝利した。その曲はコンピューターが作曲したもので、カーツワイルは200ドルを獲得した。  

そのときカーツワイルはコンピューターを披露したのだが、コンピューターは自分で組み立てたもので、キィーキィーと大きな音を立てる継電器がついたディスクサイズの装置でタイプライターに繋がっていた。それにはパネリストたちはかなり食傷気味だった。彼らはカーツワイルのパーフォーマンスよりも彼の年齢に驚いていた。次のゲスト、カリフォルニアからやっていた「ラフ&レディ」のチェスター・ロニィーさんへと皆の興味は移っていた。彼女の秘密は、リンドン・ジョンソン大統領の一年生のときの教師ということだった。  

しかしカーツワイルはその後の仕事の多くを、このとき披露したものに含意されていたことに費やすことになった。芸術を創造することは人類のために、人類のためだけに啓かれている活動の一つだ。それは自己表現の行動である。もしも自己を有していないならばできないことであろう。創造性という、人間だけに許された領域が、17歳の少年が組み立てたコンピューターに侵犯されるのを見ることは、曖昧になるはずがない一線が曖昧になることを突きつけられることである。その一線とは、生命体の知能と人工的知能の間に引かれた境界である。  

それがカーツワイルの本当の秘密であり、1965年当時には誰も思いつかないことだった。おそらくは本人さえ気づかなかっただろう、当時はまだ・・・。しかし46年後の現在、コンピューターが知能になる瞬間に我々が近づいているとカーツワイルは信じている。それも単なる知能ではなく、人間の知能以上になる瞬間に。そんなことが起これば、人間そのもの、つまり我々の身体、精神、文明は、完全に、不可逆的に姿を変えてしまうことになるだろう。この瞬間の到来は不可避であるだけでなく、切迫していると彼は信じている。彼の計算によれば、我々の知っている人類の文明の終焉は約35年先だという。コンピューターはどんどん早くなっていく。そんなことは誰でもわかっている。またコンピューターは、早くなった上に更に早くなっていく。つまり加速率が増加していくのだ。本当だろうか、そう本当なのだ。  

だからもしコンピューターが非常に早く、信じられないほど早くなって、人間の知能に匹敵するほどになりうる時がくることは考えられることだ。人工知能(AI)だ。我々の頭脳が意識を創り出すとき、頭脳活動しているものが何であれ、AIの処理能力は全力を挙げてそれと同じことをしようと張り合うだろう。迅速に計算するとかピアノ曲を作曲するだけではなく、車を運転する、本を書く、道義的決断を下す、素晴らしい絵画を楽しむ、カクテルパーティで気の利いた意見を言う、などの活動も。  

もしもあなたがこの考えを全面的に納得できるなら、そしてカーツワイルや他の多くの頭脳明晰な人たちもそうならば、そうだとすれば、全てに番狂わせが生じるだろう。その時点から、コンピューターがますます強力になることをいつか止めるだろうなどと考える根拠はなくなる。コンピューターは進化を続け、ついには我々人間よりも数段優れた知能を持つようになるだろう。同時に、コンピューターの進化率は上昇し続けるだろう。なぜなら自らの創造主である思考速度の遅い人間から、自身の進化を引き受けるだろうからだ。自らがスーパー知能を持つコンピューターであるコンピューター科学者を想像してみよう。コンピューター科学者は、信じがたいほど早く頭を働かせる。何の苦もなく膨大なデータを処理することができる。休憩なしにFarmvilleで遊ぶこともできる。  

「30年以内に、我々は超人的知能を創造する手段を手にするだろう。するとまもなく、人類の時代は終焉する」それはあり得ることだ。我々がいつの日かこの地球上に共生するかも知れないそれら(彼らと呼んでもいいが)、このような人間の知能に勝る存在がとる行動を予測することは不可能だ。なぜなら、もし予測できるくらいなら、それら(彼ら)と同程度に優秀であることになるからだ。しかし、それについては様々な理論がある。一つには、人間がコンピューターと合体して超能力のサイボーグになり、車や飛行機を利用して物理的限界を拡大する同じ方法で、コンピューターを使って我々の知的能力を進展させるかもしれない。あるいは、人工知能が高齢化による障害を治療し、我々の寿命を永遠のものにするだろう。それとも、我々の意識をスキャンしてコンピューターに取り込み、ソフトウェアとしてコンピューター内部で生き続けるかもしれない、永遠に、仮象実在として。もしかすると、コンピューターが人間に反抗し、我々を絶滅するかもしれない。これら全ての理論に共通している一点は、2011年頃に生きる人間にとっては、そのようなものと認識することがもはや不可能な何者かへと人間種が転態するということだ。この転態には名前がある。シンギュラリティーと名づけられている。  

シンギュラリティーについて語るとき、注視すべき問題は、それがまるでサイエンスフィクションのように見えようとも、そうではないということ、天気予報がサイエンスフィクションでないのと同じである。それは突拍子もない考えではない。地球上の生命体の未来についての真剣な仮説である。スーパー知能を持つ不死身のサイボーグといった考えを受け入れようとすれば、必ずあなたの知性が邪魔をして拒絶反応を示すだろうが、できることなら我慢してほしい。なぜならシンギュラリティーは一見すれば途方もない考えのように見えるが、実は真面目に注意深く検討するに値する考えであるからだ。  

人々はシンギュラリティーを理解しようと巨額のお金を費やしている。設立3年のシンギュラリティー大学では、学卒者や会社幹部のために学際的コ―スを提供していて、NASAが主催している。グーグルは設立資金の提供者で、グーグルのCEOで共同設立者でもあるラリー・ページは、昨年この大学でこう語った。人々は、まるで知的な見世物のように、衝撃度の大きさによってシンギュラリティーに引き付けられるが、予想以上のものがあるとわかって興味の根を下ろす。勿論のこと、シンギュラリティーが現実問題になった時には、人類が言葉を獲得して以降に起こった最も重要な出来事になるだろう。  

シンギュラリティーはまったく初めての考えではなく、やや目新しいだけだ。1965年に英国の数学者I.J.グッドが『知性の爆発』と名づけて書いているものがある。

「ウルトラ知能コンピューターを、どのように明晰な人間の知的活動をもはるかに凌駕するコンピューターと定義する。コンピューターのデザインはこのような知的活動の一つであるから、ウルトラ知能コンピューターは更に優れたコンピューターをもデザインできるだろう。だから『知性の爆発』であることは間違いない。そして人間の知能ははるか後方に取り残されることになる。このように、第一号ウルトラ知能コンピューターさえ発明すれば、その後は人間が何もすることがなくなる発明なのだ」  

シンギュラリティーという用語は天体物理学から借用している。それは宇宙時間のある一点を意味している。たとえば、ブラックホール内部では、通常の物理学の法則は適用されない。1980年代にサイエンスフィクション作家ヴァーナー・ヴィンジが、グッドの「知性の爆発」シナリオにシンギュラリティーを付け加えた。1993年のNASAシンポジウムで「30年以内に、超人的知能を創造する技術的手段を手に入れるだろう。するとまもなく人類の時代は終焉する」と発表した。  

そのときまでにカーツワイルもまたシンギュラリティーについて考えていた。彼は「私の秘密」に出演してから多忙な日々送ってきた。彼はエンジニアとして、また発明家としてそれなりの富を築いた。まだMITに在学当時に最初のソフトウェア会社を立ち上げ、それを売却した。視力障害者用の音声読み上げ機を作り、スティービー・ワンダーは最初の顧客だった。そしてミュージック・シンセサイザーや音声認識装置など、幅広い技術分野で発明をなした。39の特許と19の名誉博士号を取得している。1999年にはビル・クリントン大統領が彼に米国国家技術賞を贈呈した。  

しかしカーツワイルはまた同時並行的に未来学者としてのキャリアを積み上げてきた。彼は人類やコンピューター類の未来についての考えを20年間発表してきて、最近では「ポストヒューマン誕生」の中で彼の理論を書き、2005年に世に出たときはベストセラーになった。カーツワイル、トニー・ロビンス、アラン・ダーシュビッツなどが出演した同名のドキュメントフィルムは1月にリリースされた(カーツワイルは実際に2本のドキュメントフィルムの主役になっている)。他の一本は、やや権威が劣るものの情報量は多い「卓越した男」というタイトルだ。ビル・ゲイツは彼を「人工知能の未来を予測する上で、私が知る最高の人物」と評した。

生身の彼を見れば、卓越した男は風采の上がらない人物で、ウッディ・アレンよりもずっと間抜け面した弟といっても通用する。カーツワイルはニューヨークのクイーン育ちで、今でもその言葉に名残がある。62歳になった今、ソフトな語り口で、まるで催眠をかけるような静かな声で、年間60もの講演をこなす。シンギュラリティーの最も目立った論客で、これまでに何度となくあらゆる疑問に答え、頑強に信じない人たちを論破してきた。この件に関して彼は温厚だ。その態度はまるで申し訳なさそうである。「未来についてそれほど刺激的ではないニュースをお伝えできればいいのですが、でも数字を見れば、それが語るところは明確で、他に何と言えばいいのか・・・」

人類のサイボーグ的運命についてのカーツワイルの興味は、ほとんど実際的な問題として1980年頃に始まった。彼は技術的前進の速度を測り追跡する手段を必要とした。どれ程偉大な発明であっても、もし適切な時期より早く到来すれば失敗することがあるので、自分の発明を発表する時には、時宜を得たものにしたいと慎重を期したのだ。「たとえ時宜を得たとしても、テクノロジーは急速に進歩するので、プロジェクトを完成したときにはすでに世界は変化を遂げています」と彼は言う。「まるでスキート射撃のようです。的に命中することはできないのです」勿論、彼はムーアの法則を知っている。ムーアの法則とは、マイクロチップに集積できるトランジスターの数は2年ごとに倍になる、というものだ。それは驚くほど信頼性のある目安だ。カーツワイルは若干違った曲線を描いてみようとした。コンピューター処理能力の経時的変化はMIPS(100万命令/分)で計測され、1,000ドルで買い取ることができる。

結果が明らかになったとき、カーツワイルの数字はムーアの数字と非常に類似していた。数字は2年ごとに倍になった。グラフに描かれた数字は指数曲線を描き、直線グラフで増加する通常の数字とは違って、2倍に増加する数字を示していた。カーツワイルが継電器や真空管のようなトランジスター前史のコンピューティング技術時代の何十年を、1900年までずっと遡っても、曲線は不気味なほど安定していた。  

それからカーツワイルは、他の主要な技術指数の全部に数字を当てはめてみた。トランジスター製造の下落コスト、マイクロプロセッサーの上昇クロック速度、ダイナミックRAMの急落価格などである。彼はさらにバイオテクやそれ以外の分野の傾向にも目を向けた。DNA配列決定やワイヤレスデータサービスの下落価格、インターネットホスト数やナノテク特許数の上昇にも適用してみた。彼は同じ結果、つまり累乗指数的に進化は加速するという結論を出し続けた。「このような曲線軌道がいかに滑らかであるかは、まさに驚くべきことでした」と彼は言う。「いい時も悪い時も、戦争時であろうと平和時であろうと、好況期であろうと不況期であろうと」カーツワイルはそれを「収穫加速の法則」と呼んだ。テクノロジーの進歩は、直線的ではなく、累乗指数的に起こるという。

それから彼は曲線を未来へと拡張したが、曲線が予測した進歩は驚くべきものだったので、彼は心中でそのような成長に対して「認識上の抵抗」を感じたほどだった。指数曲線は緩やかに始まり、次に無限大に向かって急上昇した。カーツワイルによれば、我々は曲線的変化の観点から発想するようには進化していない。「曲線的思考法は本能的なものではありません。我々の中に組み込まれている予測能力は直線的なのです。我々が動物から身を避けようとするとき、20秒経てばどこにいるだろうか、そのときどう対処すればいいかを直線的発想で予測します。それが実際に我々の脳内に組み込まれたハードウェアなのです」

累乗指数曲線が彼に示した内容がここにある。我々は2020年中期までに人間の脳を分解して模倣することに成功する。その10年が終わるまでに、コンピューターは人間並みの知能を持つに至る。カーツワイルはシンギュラリティーの起こる日を、何事にも慎重な彼だが、2045年だと予期している。その年には、コンピューター処理能力が膨大に進化し、処理コストが大いに低減することを想定すれば、創造される人工知能の容量は、現存する人間知能の総量の約10億倍になるだろう。

シンギュラリティーは単なる理論ではない。人々を魅了し、彼らは互いに連帯感を感じる。一緒になって運動を、つまりサブカルチャーを形成する。カーツワイルはそれを共同体と呼ぶ。シンギュラリティーを真剣に受け止めようと決めると、小さいが熱心な、世界中に散在するシンギュラリアンと呼ばれる同志になる。  

彼らの全てがカーツワイル派ではない、まったく違っている。シンギュラリティー派の内部にも、シンギュラリティーとは何か、何時、どのようにシンギュラリティーが到来するか、あるいはしないのか、などについて様々な意見を許容する余地がある。しかしシンギュラリアンたちは世界観を共有している。彼らは時間を密度という観点で考え、テクノロジーが歴史を創ると信じ、何に対しても社会通念的な意味での興味をほとんど持たず、まるで人工知能革命が突発的に起こり、全てを完全に変えようとしていることなどないかのように、皆が日常生活を送り、TVを見たりしていることが信じられないと思っている。彼らは狂気の沙汰と思われることを恐れない。普通の市民から見れば明らかに馬鹿げている考えだと嫌悪されても、単なる非合理的な偏見だと受け止める。シンギュラリアンは非合理なものを相手にしないのだ。彼らの精神世界に入り込んでみれば、世界観における極論、つまり普通の人々とシンギュラリアンとを区別する、厳しい存在論的断絶があることを経験するだろう。大ショックを覚悟すべきだ。  

カーツワイルが共同設立者であるシンギュラリティー大学の他にも、サンフランシスコに本部を置く人工知能のためのシンギュラリティー研究所がある。アドバイザーの中には、元ペイパルCEOでありフェイスブックの初期投資家であるピーター・シールがいる。この研究所はシンギュラリティー・サミットという年次会議を開いている(ここでもカーツワイルは共同設立者だ)。シンギュラリティー理論は高度に学際的性格を有しているので、多彩な人たちを引き付ける。人工知能が主要なテーマだが、セッションは他の分野、たとえば遺伝学やナノテクの急激な進歩も議論の対象になる。  

2010年サミットはサンフランシスコで8月に開催されたのだが、コンピューター科学者だけではなく、心理学者、神経学者、ナノテク学者、分子生物学者、装着型コンピューター専門家、救急医療学教授、ヨウム認識能力研究家、そしてプロのマジシャンであり暴露屋「びっくり」ジェームズ・ランディなどがいた。サミットの雰囲気は、ダボス会議とUFO会議をミックスしたような奇妙なものだった。洋上都市の提案者たち(彼らがやっていることは、今のところほとんど理論でしかないが、公海に浮かぶ政治的自治を獲得しているコミュニティー)がパンフレットを配布していた。ある一角では、人造人間が来訪者とお喋りをしていた。  

人工知能の次に2010年サミットで最も話題になったのは、生命の延長だった。ほとんどの人が不変で不可避であると考えている生物学的限界を、シンギュラリアンは難しくはあるが解決できる問題であると考えている。死はその一つだ。老化が他の病気と同じだとしたら、病気の対処法は何か。病気を治療する。シンギュラリアンの多くの理論のように、最初はこっけいに聞こえるが、よくよく考えてみれば、それほどこっけいではないように思える。それは願望ではなく、現に進行している現実の科学なのだ。  

たとえば、老化に伴い肉体的退行を引き起こす原因の一つに、テロメアが関係していることはよく知られている。テロメアとは染色体の末端にあるDNAの部位である。細胞分裂のたびに、テロメアは短くなり、細胞のテロメアがなくなってしまえば、細胞はもはや再生不可能になり死滅する。しかしこの行程を逆行させるテロメラーゼという酵素が存在する。ガン細胞が長期間生存する理由の一つだ。だとすれば、一般的な非ガン細胞をテロメラーゼで治療すればどうか。11月にハーバード大医学部の研究者は、ネイチャー誌にまさにこのことを実施したと発表した。老化に伴う退行を発症したマウス群にテロメラーゼを投与した。すると傷害は消滅した。マウスは回復しただけではなく、若返りさえした。  

オーブリ・デ・グレイは世界的に有名な生命延長研究者の一人であり、シンギュラリティー・サミットの古くからの常連だ。ケンブリッジで博士号を取得した英国人生物学者であり、ものすごい様相の髭で知られるデ・グレイは、人工的老化防止戦略(SENS)という研究所を運営している。彼は老化を、傷害が蓄積していく過程として捉え、7つのカテゴリーに分類し、いつの日かそれぞれのカテゴリーに対して再生医薬を使って処置できることを願っている。「宇宙の熱死のように、老化を抵抗できないものだと考えるのは馬鹿げていると、人々は気づき始めています」と彼は言う。「子供じみています。人間の肉体は多くの機能を有する機械であり、機械が普通に機能すればそれに伴って傷害が起きるように、様々なタイプの傷害を蓄積していきます。だからまず第一に言えることは、その傷害は定期的に修復できるのであって、だからこそビンテージカーが存在するのです。実のところ、ただ注意を払うだけでいいのです。医薬というものは全体に、どうしようもないと思えるものに研究の手を伸ばし、ついにはその処置法を解明するといったものから成り立っているのです」  

カーツワイルもまた生命の延長を真剣に考えている。カーツワイルと親密な関係にあった父は58歳のとき心臓病で亡くなった。彼は父の遺伝的体質を受け継いでいた。また彼は35歳のとき2型糖尿病を発症した。長寿薬を専門としたテリー・グロスマン医師と協働して、カールワイツ自身の生命延長研究に関する2冊の著作を発行したが、1日に200の錠剤とサプルメントを投与するというものだった。彼の糖尿病は根本的に治癒され、実年齢は62歳だとしても、生物学的年齢はそれよりおよそ20歳若いと彼は言う。  

しかし彼の目標はグレイの目標と少し違っている。カーツワイルは、できるだけ健康に生きることにはそれほど興味はなかった。シンギュラリティーの瞬間に立ち会うまで生きればそれでよかった。計画的バトンタッチなのだ。スーパー知能を持つ人工知能が進歩したナノテクで武装して出現すると、実際に彼らは人間の老化に伴う非常に複雑で体系的な問題に取り組むだろう。あるいはその時までに、コンピューターやロボットのようなもっと頑強な器へと、我々の精神を移すことができるだろう。彼を始めとする多くのシンギュラリアンは、現代に生きる多くの人々が機能的に不死身になるという意見を真面目に受け止めている。  

それは過激であると同時に、古くからある考えでもある。「ビザンティウムへの船出」の中でW.B.イェイツは、人間の肉体的苦境を、死の淵にある命に執着する魂として表現している(「欲望に燃え命に執着するわたしの心を」訳:壺齋散人)。魂を解き放ち、その代わりとして不死身のロボットに魂を繋ぎとめればいいではないか。しかしカーツワイルは、生命の延長を聴いた人たちが、累乗指数的成長曲線を聴くよりも、更に強い抵抗を示すことを知っている。「人間よりも知能が高いコンピューターを受け入れる人々はいます」と彼は言う。「しかし、人間の寿命を大きく変えるという考えを受け入れる人はいないし、特に議論を巻き起こすことになりそうです。人々は生と死に関する問題を扱う領域の哲学に、多くの努力を個人的に注いできました。つまり、それが宗教を信じる大きな理由なのです」

 勿論、多くの人たちはシンギュラリティーをナンセンスだと考えている。夢物語、願望であり、理不尽なことを言ったり似非科学で理屈付けをしたりして生活費を稼ぐ人間がでっち上げた、不死の歓喜という福音的お話のシリコンバレー版でしかないと。真面目な批評家たちのほとんどは、コンピューターが本当に知能を持つかどうかという問題に関心を向けている。  

人工知能(AI)のすべての分野はこの問題に向けられている。しかしAIは現在のところ、人間や、あるいは映画に出てくるハルやC3POやDataのように会話をするコンピューターを連想させる知能すら創られていない。現実のAIはかなり特定された領域を習得できるだけであり、検索クエリーを解釈したりチェスをしたりするだけだ。これらのAIは極めて特異な枠内で作動する。パーティーでの会話はしない。これを知性と読んでもいいが、およそ眼には見えないほど小さなものを知能と定義した限りである。カーツワイルが語るような知能は、強度のAIあるいは人工知能と呼ばれるが、いまだ存在していない。

 なぜまだなのか。累乗指数的に増加する計算能力が、この高さに到達するのを我々は明らかに待ち望んでいる。しかし同時に、コンピューターにどれほど多くのミップス(MIPS)を投入しても、電子的に模倣できないものが我々の脳の中で進行している可能性がある。我々が人間の意識として知っている、一時的混乱を生み出す神経化学的基本設計はあまりに複雑でアナログなので、デジタルシリコン内部で模倣できない。生物学者デニス・ブレイは、昨年夏のシンギュラリティー・サミットで反対意見を言った数少ない参加者の一人だ。「人間の体内にある要素は、電子回路の要素に匹敵するような方法で作動するが、両者の適応できる状態は膨大に違っているので、両者は別のものである」と、『細胞にできて、ロボットにできないものは何か』というタイトルの著書で彼は論じている。「複合的な生物化学工程は、タンパク分子の化学修飾を作り、更には細胞の確定された部位で固有の構造に媒介されて多様化する。その結果生じる状態の結合的急増は、過去と現在の状態に関する情報を記憶するほとんど無限といえる容量や、将来の出来事に備える独自の容量を備えた生きたシステムをもたらす」それから見れば、コンピューターがやり取りする1と0がかなり稚拙に見えてくる。  

多くの哲学的問題が、実践的な問題の基底に横たわっている。人間と識別できない方法で話したり行動したりするコンピューターを創造したとしよう。言い換えれば、チューリングテストに合格するコンピューターだ(非常に大雑把に言えば、そのようなコンピューターは目隠し試験で人間とみなされる)。だとしたら、人間と同じように、コンピューターに感覚があることを意味するのだろうか。あるいは、究極的に進歩したとはいえ、本質的には機械的自動化であり、意識が生み出す神秘的な才気のほとばしりなどはない、つまり、魂を持たない機械でしかないのか。我々にわかるはずもないが。  

たとえシンギュラリティーがあり得ることだと納得しても、なお混沌とした不可解な問題が目前にある。もし私の意識をスキャンしてコンピューターに取り込んだとしたら、私はまだ私だといえるのだろうか。シンギュラリティーの地政学とか、社会経済学とはどのようなものか。永遠の命を得られる人間を誰が決定するのか。知覚できる、できないという判断を誰がするのだろうか。そして我々が不滅の命、全知、全能に近づくとき、それでも我々の命に意味があるのだろうか。死を克服することによって、我々はかけがえのない人間性を失ってしまうのだろうか。

 改良を重ねることによっても精緻化することができない基本的なリスクがシンギュラリティーにはあることを、カーツワイルは認めている。それは単に、高度に進歩した人工知能が、地球上に新たに生まれた住人と知った時にどんな行動を選び取るか、我々にはわからないからだ。我々と資源を奪い合おうと考えないかも知れない。シンギュラリティー研究所の目標の一つは、人工知能が進歩しても、人間に優しいことを確かなものにすることだ。自分たちの生物圏内に優秀な生命体が発生することはダーウィン主義者の根本的誤謬になると理解するために、何もあなたがスーパー知能のサイボーグになる必要はない。  

もしシンギュラリティーが出現するとすれば、その答えを好むと好まざるとに関わらず、これらの疑問は解決することだろうし、テクノロジーを禁止することによってシンギュラリティーを先延ばしにすることは不可能であるばかりではなく、非倫理的であり危険であると、カーツワイルは考えている。「そのような禁止を行うことは、全体主義体制が必要です」と彼は言う。「効果はないでしょう。そんなことをしても、単にこれらのテクノロジーを地下に潜伏させてしまうだけにしかならず、潜伏してしまえば、防衛手段を講じるために頼る科学者たちは容易にそのツールに接近できなくなるでしょう」  

カーツワイルは超人的なほど忍耐強く完璧な論者だ。彼は論争を楽しんでいる。相手を論破するのに疲れを知らず、論敵に対して一つ一つ、注意深く、細部にわたって対応できる。  

生命体の脳の生物化学的複雑さを、コンピューターが複製することができるかという問題を取り上げてみよう。カーツワイルはどんなことでも、この点では決して譲歩しない。肉体と思考できないシリコンとの間にある根本的な違いを、カーツワイルは認めない。少なくとも、コンピューターを作動するソフトウェアによる力と柔軟性において、モデル化できない、あるいは適合できない神経学的機序を考え付く生物学者を、カーツワイルは無視する。人間の脳の神秘性に屈服することを、カーツワイルは拒否する。「一般的に、批評家たちに私が同意できない核心点は、彼らが『みろ、カーツワイルは人間の脳や生物学の複雑さの逆転エンジニアリングを軽く見ている』と言うことだ。しかし私は、問題を軽く見ているとは思っていない。累乗指数的な進捗力を彼らの方こそ軽く見ているのです」

 このような立場をとっても、カーツワイルは外れ者にはなっていない。少なくともシンギュラリアンの間では。多くの人たちはもっと極端な予想をしている。2005年から、神経学者ヘンリー・マークラムはスイスのロザンヌにあるエコール・ポリテクニークの脳心研究所で野心的な先進的研究を行っていた。それはブルー・ブレイン・プロジェクトと呼ばれ、IBMのコンピューター『ブルー・ジーン(Blue Gene)』を使って、哺乳類の脳の神経細胞からシミュレーションして神経細胞を作ろうという試みだった。今のところ、マークラムチームはラットの脳から一つの新皮質カラムをシミュレートするのに成功し、それには10,000の神経細胞が含まれていた。マークラムは、10年以内に人間の仮象頭脳を完成させて活動させたいと述べた(カーツワイルですらこの考えをまともに受け取っていない。もしそれが成功したとしても、と彼は指摘するのだが、その頭脳を教育しなければならず、どれほど長くかかるのかわからない)。  

定義によれば、シンギュラリティーが登場して以降の将来は、我々の直線的、化学的、動物的頭脳によっては知りえないものだが、カーツワイルはそれについての理論を支援している。彼は積極的に、より大きな発想へと自分を駆り立てていく。自分の老化していく有機的ハードウェアという限界に挑んでいこうとしているのがわかる。「現在進行している累乗指数的進歩が意味するところを知ると、人々はますます受け入れがたくなっていきます」と彼は言う。「だから、物事が累乗指数的に進化することを本当に受け入れる人々を獲得しますが、しかしある時点で彼らは脱落していくのです。なぜならその内容があまりにも現実離れし過ぎているからです。私は現実的に考えようと努力してきました」  

カーツワイルが考える未来においては、バイオテクやナノテクは、人間の身体や我々を取り巻く世界を、分子レベルで意のままに操作する力を我々に与えてくれる。進歩は超高速で加速し、1時間が1世紀分の価値にあたる科学的発見をもたらす。我々はダーウィン理論を投げ捨て、我々自身の進化を自ら引き受ける。人間のゲノムは非常に多くのコードになり、バッグテストされ最大限に活用され、もし必要なら書き換えられる。不死の生命が現実になる。人が死にたいと望んだときにだけ死滅する。死の棘はきれいさっぱりと消滅する。カーツワイルは亡くなった父親を生き返らせたいと思う。

 人間はその意識をスキャンしてコンピューターに取り込み、仮象実在になり、あるいは我々の肉体を不死のロボットと取り換え、銀河系間に存在する小神として宇宙の片隅に退散することができる。何世紀か経過すれば、人間の知能が宇宙の森羅万象を再製造し、充満させるだろう。これがカーツワイルの信じる種としての我々の運命だ。  

あるいはそうでない場合はどうか。大問題が答えを得るとき、誰も知らない、コンピューターの奥深い暗闇のシリコン頭脳の内部で、多くの行動が始まる。それは少しずつ意識を持つ精神世界へと開花していく、あるいは知覚のないまま、更なる輝きと力の反復をただ続けていく。

 しかし、小さな問題は、すでに我々を取り巻く周囲いっぱいに、ごく普通の情景として決定されている。シンギュラリティーについて読めば読むほど、思わぬ方向から、シンギュラリティーがこっそりと、あなたを見つめていることに気づく。5年前には、たった一つの電子ネットワークを使って、6億人の社会生活が進行してはいなかった。今や我々はフェイスブックを持っている。5年前には、携帯用ネットが使えるデジタル補綴器を使って、話しながら、行きながら同時に、話そうとしている事や行こうとしている場所をダブルチェックなどすることはなかった。今ではi-Phoneがある。i-Phoneを我々の手中ではなく、頭蓋の中に埋め込むことは、想像を超えるほどの飛躍だろうか。  

すでに30,000人のパーキンソン病患者が神経細胞を移植されている。グーグルは車を運転するコンピューターを実験している。アフガニスタンでは、2,000台以上のロボットが人間の軍隊と一緒に戦闘している。今月、ゲームショーが人工知能の歴史に再度その足跡を残そうとしているが、今回はコンピューターがゲストになる。ワトソンというニックネームのIBMのスーパー・コンピューターが「ジェパディ」で競い合った。ワトソンは立て続けに90のサーバーを相手にし、その場を席巻し、1月の練習試合で2人の元チャンピオン、ケン・ジェニングスとブラッド・ラターよりいい成績で終了した。出された質問全てに答えて、全問正解したのだが、注目すべきは、平易な英語でまとめられていたので、コンピューターは質問を(厳密に言えば、答えを)理解する助けを必要としなかった。ワトソンは強力なAIではなかったが、もし強力なAIが出現するとすれば、徐々に、少しずつ姿を見せるだろうし、これがその小さい一歩になるだろう。  

今から100年経った時、カーツワイルやデ・グレイを始めとする他のメンバーたちは、建国の父に対する22世紀の回答足りうるだろうか。建国の父との相違点は別にしても、その功績を認められる時、彼らが生存しているということだ。あるいは彼らの理論はひどく古びたものに見えて、ディズニーのトゥモローランドのように時代遅れになるかも知れない。未来ほど早く歳を取るものはない。  

たとえ彼らの未来観が完全に間違っていようとも、現在については正しいといえる。彼らは長期的視点を持っているし、鳥瞰的に全体を見ている。あなたはシンギュラリアン憲章についての個別の条項を拒否するかもしれないが、カーツワイルが未来を真剣に考えていることは賞賛すべきだ。シンギュラリティー派は、変化は現実に起こり、人類は自身の運命に責任を持つべきであり、歴史は惰性で継続するほど単純ではない、という考えに立脚している。カーツワイルは次のことを好んで指摘する。あなたが使っている平均的な携帯電話は、カーツワイルが40年前にMITで使用していたコンピューターよりも、サイズは100万分の1小さく、価格は100万分の1で、1000倍強力だと。そのことを40年先に置き換えると、世界はどんな風に見えるのだろうか。もしも本当に理解したいと思うならば、自分の置かれた場所から非常に遠くを見つめて考えなければならない。あるいは、おそらく、以前に誰が試みたよりも深く、自分の置かれた場所の深部を考えなければならないだろう。

How Germany Became the China of Europe
Monday, Mar. 07, 2011
By Michael Schuman / Stuttgart

Ten years ago, Germany's economy was a shambles. Now it's an export machine. What can America leaern from an Old World tiger?

There is no particularly special technology needed to make a chainsaw. It's really just plastic and metal parts screwed together with old-fashioned nuts and bolts. The Chinese already make chainsaws. But that hasn't stopped German power-tool manufacturer Stihl from selling its made-in-Germany chainsaws around the world, even though its top-end models are among the priciest on the market. In fact, 86% of the products Stihl makes in its high-cost German factories are exported. How Stihl manages that says a lot about the impact a revived German economy is having on Europe and the world — both good and bad.

The family-owned firm, based near Stuttgart in Germany's south, could shift more production to its lower-wage factories in China and Brazil, but management is committed to manufacturing many of its most advanced products at home. In contrast to the American habit of outsourcing as much as possible, about half the parts in a German-made chainsaw — from the chain to the crankshaft — are produced in Stihl factories, and many of them are made in Germany. And instead of laying off staff during the Great Recession, as so many U.S. firms did, Stihl locked in highly trained talent by offering full-time workers an employment guarantee until 2015. Stihl even added specialists to its product-development team during the downturn. The result is high-quality products that command price tags big enough — professional Stihl chainsaws cost as much as $2,300 in Germany — to make manufacturing profitable even with the nation's high wages. U.S. companies "don't try hard enough to keep production inside the country," says Stihl chairman Bertram Kandziora.

Stihl defines how Germany resurrected its economy — and how the U.S. might too. The small, often family-owned enterprises that make up the backbone of German manufacturing have historically specialized in the unsexy side of the industrial spectrum: not smart phones or iPads but machinery and other heavy equipment, metal bashing infused with sound technology and disciplined engineering. But in recent years, German firms, aided by farsighted government reforms, have turned that into an art form, forging the most competitive industrial sector of any advanced economy. The proof is a boom in exports, which jumped 18.5% in 2010, that is the envy of the developed world.

That surge has carried Germany out of the Great Recession more quickly than most major industrialized countries. GDP rose 3.6% in 2010, compared with 2.9% in the U.S. While joblessness in the U.S. and much of Europe has spiked to levels not seen in decades, unemployment in Germany has declined during the crisis, to an estimated 6.9% in 2010 from 8.6% in 2007, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). "Germany is in a very competitive position today, more than ever," proclaims Stéphane Garelli, director of the World Competitiveness Center at the Swiss business school IMD.

Germany's revival has reversed its role in Europe. Less than a decade ago, Germany was a bumbling behemoth beset by chronic unemployment and pathetic growth. As its more aggressive neighbors such as Spain, Britain and Ireland rode the craze in global finance to stellar performances, they looked at Germany as their stodgy old uncle, unable to change outdated, socialist habits and adapt to a new world. But the financial crisis proved just the opposite. While Spain, Ireland and other former euro-zone highflyers tumble into debt crises, victims of excessive exuberance and risky policies, a steady but reformed Germany has emerged as Europe's dominant economic power. According to the OECD, Germany accounted for 60% of the GDP growth of the euro zone in 2010, up from only 10% in the early 2000s. "We changed from the sick man of Europe to the engine," says Steffen Kampeter, parliamentary state secretary at Germany's Ministry of Finance in Berlin.

Germany's engine, however, has spewed toxic fumes. As manufacturers rev exports, the rest of Europe has been unable to compete. Some 80% of Germany's trade surplus is with the rest of the European Union. The more German industry excels, the more other Europeans feel that Germany's success comes at their expense, cracking open schisms within the euro zone just when the region can least afford them. "There is frustration with Germany," says André Sapir, a senior fellow at Bruegel, a Brussels-based think tank. "Germany is moving ahead, but what are they doing for the rest of Europe?"
Europe's China

In many respects, Germany's role in the world economy is similar to China's. Both are manufacturing monsters that are bringing instability as well as benefits to the world. Because of its export machine, Germany, like China, runs up a humongous current-account surplus, while its less competitive neighbors, like Spain, have fallen into deep deficits.

These differences are at the heart of Europe's debt crisis. Many in the zone blame Germany's export-dependent economy for the region's economic woes, in the same way that Washington accuses China of hampering the U.S. recovery. Unless the economies of Europe are brought into better balance, some economists fear, the region could get stuck in a low-growth pattern that could make the debt crisis harder to resolve, threatening the future of the entire monetary union. Mimicking the argument Washington makes about China, Germany's European partners believe Berlin has to alter its model to better support regional growth. The European Commission, the E.U.'s governing body, has called on surplus nations like Germany to stimulate consumer spending at home in order to help support the E.U. economy as a whole. French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde has complained that Germany must show "a sense of common destiny" and reform its economy for the good of Europe.

Berlin, however, believes German exports are good not just for Germany but for all of Europe. Much like China in Asia, Germany sits at the center of a network of regional suppliers that feed its export industries with parts and other resources. The more German factories export, the more they suck in from Germany's neighbors, sparking growth well beyond its borders. Kampeter points out that German imports from the rest of the euro zone are expanding more quickly than Germany's exports to the region — 16.7% vs. 12.7% in 2010. "A growing Germany is better for the E.U. and the world economy than a Germany that is a shrinking economic power," he says. In German eyes, the answer to Europe's woes isn't a Germany that exports less but reform in the weaker economies to make them healthier and more competitive.


The German Model

It's a strong point. While the Spanish, Irish and other Europeans were gorging on debt, building too many houses and giving themselves fat pay raises, Germans were busy fixing their economy. German companies poured money into R&D and cut expenses. Loosening up the tightly regulated labor market to make it easier for firms to hire and fire helped. Union cooperation meant Germany was the only major European economy that reduced labor costs for several years after 2005. Germany churns out specialized products of such superior quality, from BMW sports cars to Kärcher cleaning equipment, that customers will pay extra for the "Made in Germany" label. That has kept the country in front of emerging economies like China's and helped it benefit from their rapid growth. German exports to China surged 45% in the first 10 months of 2010. In fact, Germany is the only major industrialized country other than Japan in which exports are playing a significantly larger role in the economy — 41% of GDP in 2009, from 33% in 2000. German industry may provide an answer to one of the thorniest economic issues facing the developed world: how to maintain manufacturing competitiveness against low-cost emerging economies. Germany "is a road map for the U.S. and other countries," says Bernd Venohr, a Munich-based business consultant.

German executives and policymakers also found inventive ways to ensure that factories kept their edge during the Great Recession. And the nation prevented the sort of large-scale layoffs the U.S. endured during the recession with a short-term work program in which the government subsidized firms to keep workers. At the program's peak, in 2009, more than 1.4 million workers were involved. At BASF's chemicals complex in Ludwigshafen, engineers worked furiously to keep the multibillion-dollar machinery running smoothly as production dwindled. At one of the facilities, demand for its ethylene and other chemicals sank from 100% of capacity to a mere 14% in just 100 days in late 2008. Unable to shut down superhot machinery in winter — the pipes could have frozen, causing costly damage — the plant's engineers kept the facility operating through a complicated recycling scheme. Instead of laying off cherished staff, management deployed idled workers to new assignments. Bernhard Nick, a BASF president, believes the measures taken during the downturn kept the company primed to capitalize on the recovery. "It wasn't just a family feeling or being nice to each other," he says. "Even the normal shift workers have such a high skill level, it is not so easy to lay them off. You lose a lot of knowledge, which would give you big problems starting up again." (See how Germany is helping pull Europe out of recession.)


Crisis Mismanagement

The successes are prodding the rest of Europe to become more German by copying Berlin's reforms. French President Nicolas Sarkozy stared down protesters late last year and raised the retirement age by two years — a step Germany took in 2007. In June, Spain's Prime Minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, pushed through the parliament a labor-reform bill, aiming, like Germany, to reduce the nation's perpetually high unemployment. But catching Germany won't be easy. Since Germany and its neighbors all use the euro, the zone's weaker economies can't employ the simplest tool to regain competitiveness — depreciating one's currency, which is the U.S.'s preferred way of reducing its trade deficit with China — and instead must suppress wages and costs.

The German attitude toward the euro zone — that the weak must become strong — has filtered into the country's response to the European debt crisis. Berlin, which holds virtual veto power over E.U. decisions, has pushed prostrate euro-zone partners into painful reform programs in an attempt to rebuild investor confidence. In return, Germany has backed E.U. — International Monetary Fund bailouts from a $1 trillion fund created last May. But the budget cuts and other austerity measures that go along with the bailouts have only further inflamed the rest of Europe against Germany. Germans "look at Southern Europe, and they see us as a burden," says José Ignacio Torreblanca, head of the Madrid office of the European Council on Foreign Relations. "They think it is better to solve their own problems and the system will take care of itself."

Many economists believe that solving the debt crisis will require not just emergency cash for debt-ridden governments but also a tighter economic union. Yet German Chancellor Angela Merkel has consistently resisted or rejected proposals to address the euro zone's ills that entail greater sacrifices on Germany's part, like a recent call for a Eurobond jointly backed by the region's governments. Granted, Merkel has been hamstrung by voters who are in no mood to see their taxes diverted to profligate neighbors. But some in the region believe the Chancellor is putting her selfish needs over the good of Europe as a whole. Jean-Claude Juncker, the Prime Minister of Luxembourg, recently accused Germany of being "un-European."


Rebalancing Act

Such criticism stings in Berlin. "We see the euro as a peace- and freedom-keeping mission, not only an economic instrument," says Kampeter. "We'll do everything to stabilize this instrument." But Berlin has to do more. The answer to the world's Germany problem is similar to that of its China problem: both countries have to rebalance, to find new sources of domestic growth so they don't distort the global economy.

In Germany's case, that means helping Luka Rajkovic. The 49-year-old has spent his 25-year career on the assembly line of a Siemens power-equipment factory in Berlin. Fully aware that his job could be moved to lower-wage China, Rajkovic and his colleagues have accepted smaller pay raises in return for job security. Late last year, Siemens extended an employment guarantee to 2013. But the bargain leaves Rajkovic searching for bargains. With two children to care for, he delays costly purchases and hunts for sales. "What's the point of earning a little more and losing your job in two years' time?" he says.

All of middle-class Germany has made that choice, and as a result, it isn't benefiting as much as it should from the country's export boom. Markus Grabka, a researcher at the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin, estimates that the disposable income of the German middle class hasn't increased at all in the past decade. About a fifth of the workforce, he says, is stuck in insecure and poorly paid jobs, often earning a dismal $550 a month. Ironically, the very factors that are fueling the German export machine — lower labor costs created by greater flexibility — are also pressuring the welfare of the middle class in the same way it has come under strain in the U.S. The solution may be to liberalize tightly regulated domestically oriented sectors — especially services such as education and retail — that are much less productive than manufacturing. Freeing those industries would create more jobs with better wages and boost the spending power of the German public. It would also help Germany offset its dependence on exports. "You've got the goose that lays the golden egg — the export sector — but that isn't enough to get the entire economy doing better," says Bart van Ark, chief economist at the Conference Board in New York City.

There is a clear awareness of that fact in Berlin. "We have learned that reform is not only a 10-year program but an everlasting challenge," says Kampeter. A more balanced Germany (much like a more balanced China) would minimize the negatives the country's economy is causing for the world and maximize the positives — the U.S., for example, could sell more of its products to German companies and consumers. But for Germany's new economic miracle to be truly secure, the reformist spirit needs to reach outside its borders. In an integrated Europe, Germany can thrive only with its neighbors, not in spite of them, and that requires that Berlin accept reform of the entire euro zone and Germany's role within it. A strong Germany has an opportunity to guide Europe out of crisis, if its leaders are willing to grasp it. "They can promote a future good for everybody," says Torreblanca. "But they don't want to lead." If that changes, Germany will benefit. So will Europe — and the world.

こうしてドイツは欧州の中国になった

10年前、ドイツの経済はガタガタだった。いまや輸出大国だ。旧大陸の獅子からアメリカは何を学ぶのか。


-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

チェーンソーを作るのに特別の専門技術は必要ない。ただ旧式のナットとボルトで締められたプラスティックと金属の部品があれば事足りる。中国はすでにチェーンソーを作っている。だからといってドイツの電力工具製作会社スチールが製作したドイツ製のチェーンソーを世界中に販売する妨げにはならない。たとえそれが最高級品として市場で最高の価格がつこうとも。事実、スチール社が高コストのドイツ国内工場で製作する製品の86%が輸出されている。スチィール社がそれをいかに管理しているかは、活気を取り戻したドイツ経済が、良かれ悪かれ、ヨーロッパや世界に与えている影響について、多くのことを示唆している。

 ドイツ南部のシュタットガルト近くに本社があるファミリービジネスの会社だが、中国やブラジルの低賃金の工場に製造部門をもっと移すこともできようが、最先端の製品の多くを国内で製作することにこだわっている。可能な限り外注化するアメリカの傾向とは逆に、ドイツ製のパーツの半分は、チェーンからクランク軸まで、スチール社の工場で、しかもその多くはドイツ国内で製作される。大不況の間には、従業員をレイオフする代わりに(米国の非常に多くの工場はそうしたのだが)、スチール社は、正社員に2015年までの雇用保障を提示することによって、高度に訓練された技術者を維持した。しかもスチール社は、不況時に製品開発チームにスペシャリストを雇い入れた。結果は、高価格を必然化する高品質の製品を製作し、ドイツ国内の高賃金をもってしてもなお利益がある製品を製作した(スチール社のプロ用チェーンソーの価格はドイツ国内で2,300ドル)。米国の企業は「国内での製作を何とか続けようという努力をしませんでした」とスチール社ベルトラム・カンヂオラ社長は言う。

 スチール社は、如何にドイツが経済復興をなしえたかを、また米国にもやればできることを明示している。ドイツ製造業の背骨を形成しているのは小規模な、ファミリービジネスが多く、産業のあまり魅力のない部門で専門化されてきた歴史を持つ。それはスマートフォンやi-Padではなく、重機などの機械類、音響技術で鍛えられた金属殴打技術、そして基本に忠実な設計である。しかし最近になってドイツ企業は、先見の明のある政府の改革のおかげで、その技術を芸術的形態へと転換させ、どんなに発展した経済にも負けない最も有力な産業部門を作り上げた。その証拠に輸出の伸びがあり、2010年には18.5%へと跳ね上がり、先進諸国の羨望の的になった。

 このような成長を遂げたドイツは、主要先進諸国の中でもいち早く大不況から脱出した。2010年には、2.9%の米国に比べてドイツのGDPは3.6%になった。米国やヨーロッパの多くの国の失業率は、何十年来見られなかったほど高い数字に跳ね上がったが、ドイツの失業率は危機の間にも下降し、経済協力開発機構(OECD)によると2007年の8.6%から2010年には6.9%になった。「今日のドイツは非常に高い競争力を有しています、かつてないほどです」スイス・ビジネススクールIMDの世界競争力センター所長ステファン・ガレリは言う。

 ドイツの再生はヨーロッパにおける役割を逆転させた。あれから1年も経たないが、当時のドイツは慢性的失業とひどい低成長に囚われて叫び声を上げるビヒモスだった。スペイン、英国、アイルランドのようにより積極的に活動する近隣諸国は、世界金融景気の波に乗りとびぬけた業績を上げていたので、ドイツを野暮ったい爺さんで、時代遅れな社会主義的気質を変えることができず、新しい世界に適応できないと考えていた。しかし、金融危機はそれが逆であることを証明した。スペイン、アイルランドなど旧ユーロ圏で好況を誇っていた国々が、過度な経済活動や高リスクな政策の犠牲である債務危機へと転落する一方で、ゆっくりではあるが改革を進めたドイツは、ヨーロッパの圧倒的な経済大国として出現した。OECDによれば、2000年代初期にはたった10%だったが、2010年にはユーロ圏のGDP成長の60%を占めるようになった。「我々はヨーロッパの病人から、動力へと変化したのです」とドイツ財務相副大臣ステファン・カンピーターは言う。

 しかしながら、ドイツの動力は害毒を噴出した。製造業が輸出を伸ばしたので、他のヨーロッパ諸国は対抗できなくなった。ドイツの貿易黒字の約80%はEU諸国を相手にしたものだった。ドイツ産業が突出すればするほど、他のヨーロッパ諸国はドイツの成功は自分たちの犠牲から生み出されている感じ、ユーロ圏でほとんど経済的余裕がなくなったとき、ユーロ圏内で分裂が生じる。「ドイツに苛立ちを感じています」というのはブリュッセルに本部を置くシンクタンク、ブリューゲルの上級会員、アンドレ・サピアだ。「ドイツは先に進んでいますが、ヨーロッパ諸国のためにドイツは何をしているのでしょうか」

< ヨーロッパの中国 >
 多くの点で、世界経済の中におけるドイツの役割は中国のそれに似ている。両国とも製造業の怪物で、世界に利益をもたらすが、同様に不安定をもたらしている。輸出大国であるが故に、ドイツは中国のように途方もない経常黒字を生み出し、一方ではスペインのように、さほど競争力のない隣国が深刻な赤字に転落した。

 このような格差は、ヨーロッパの債務危機の根幹をなす。ユーロ圏の多くの国々は、圏内の経済的困窮をドイツの輸出依存経済の所為だと非難し、それは米国政府が自国の経済回復を中国が阻んでいると非難している同じ論法だ。ヨーロッパ経済の均衡がもっと良くならない限り、何人かのエコノミストが懸念するように、低成長パターンから脱出できなくなり、ヨーロッパを更に回復不能な債務危機へと追いやることになり、通貨統合全体を脅かすことになるだろう。米国政府が中国に対して行った論法そっくりに、ドイツのヨーロッパの盟友諸国は、ドイツ政府は地域の成長をもっと支援する姿勢へと転換しなければならないと考えている。EU運営機関である欧州委員会は、ドイツのような黒字経済諸国に対して、EU経済全体を支えるために自国内での消費を奨励するように要求している。フランス財務大臣クリステーナ・ラガルドは、ドイツは『運命共同体的感覚』を示すべきであり、ヨーロッパの利益になる経済改革を行わなければならない、と不平を述べた。

 しかしながらドイツ政府は、ドイツの輸出は単にドイツのためだけではなく、全ヨーロッパの利益になっていると考えている。アジアにおける中国のように、ヨーロッパの輸出産業にパーツや他の材料を提供する地域供給ネットワークの中心に鎮座している。ドイツの工場が輸出量を増やせば増やすほど、国境を越えて目まぐるしく成長を遂げていき、ドイツの隣国からより多くの利益を搾取することになる。他のユーロ圏諸国からのドイツの輸入量は、その地域への輸出量よりもより急速に拡大している。2010年においては16.7%対12.7%だとカーピーターは指摘する。「萎んでいく経済大国ドイツよりも経済成長するドイツの方が、EUや世界経済にとっていいことだ」と彼は言う。ドイツから見れば、ヨーロッパの苦悩に対してなすべきことは、ドイツが輸出を控えることではなくて、弱体化した経済をより健全で競争力のあるものにしていくための改革である。

< ドイツモデル >
 これは説得力がある指摘だ。スペイン人、アイルランド人などのヨーロッパの人たちが家を建てたり、大幅賃上げをしたりして、借金を膨らませていっている間に、ドイツ人は必死になって経済を立て直してきた。ドイツ企業は研究開発に資金を注ぎ込み、支出を削減した。厳しく規制されていた労働市場を緩和し、会社が雇用や解雇をやり易くした。労働組合の協力を得たことは、2005年以降の数年間、ドイツが労働者の人件費を削減した唯一の主要ヨーロッパ経済であることを意味した。BMWスポーツカーからカーチャ―清掃道具まで、ドイツ製のラベルを見ればたとえ高くても消費者が購入するような、優れた品質の専門的に特化した製品を次々と生産してきた。このことが、中国経済のような新興経済力よりも前にドイツを立たせてきたし、急速な成長からの利益を享受させてきた。ドイツの中国への輸出は2010年最初の10ヶ月で45%増加した。事実、輸出が経済において極めて大きな役割を果たしているのは、日本を除けば、ドイツが唯一の主要先進国である。2000年には対GDP33%だったが、2009年には41%になっている。ドイツ産業は先進国が直面する厳しい経済問題の一つに対する答えを提供するかもしれない。新興諸国の低コスト経済に対抗して、製造部門の競争力を如何にして維持するかだ。ドイツは米国やその他の諸国とっての「ロードマップです」、そうミュンヘンで活動するビジネス・コンサルタントのバーンド・ヴェノアーは言う。

 また経済不況の間に、工場が確実に優位を保つことができる独創的な方法を、ドイツの経営陣や政策立案者たちは見出した。そして、米国が行ったような、会社が労働者の雇用を継続するために政府が補助金を出し、短期労働プログラムを実施して経済不況を耐え抜いたような、ある意味では大規模なレイオフをドイツは回避した。2009年にはプログラムは最大になり、140万人以上の労働者が対象になった。ルートウィヒスハーフェンのBASF化学工場では、整備工たちはがむしゃらに働き、生産縮小にも関わらず何十億ドルもする機械を順調に稼動し続けた。工場の一つでは、エチレンなどの化学物質に対する需要は、2008年後半のたった100日間で生産量が100%からわずか14%まで落ち込んだ。冬に機械を停止すればパイプは凍結し損害が生じるかも知れないので、超最新の機械を止めるわけにはいかず、工場の整備工たちは複雑なリサイクル計画を使って工場を稼動し続けた。大切な従業員をレイオフする代わりに、管理者は仕事のない労働者を新たな任務に配置した。BASF社のバーンハード・ニック社長は、景気低迷の時期に採用した方法が会社を引き締め、復興への資金の備えになったと信じている。「それは単なる身内意識とか、あるいは馴れ合い的心情ではありません」と彼は言う。「通常勤務の労働者であっても素晴らしく高度な技術を持っています。彼らを簡単にレイオフなどできません。多くの知識を失うことになり、再び操業を開始する時に大きな問題を抱えることになるでしょう」

 < 危機管理 >
 ドイツの成功に刺激された他のヨーロッパ諸国は、ドイツの改革を見習って、ドイツを越えようとしている。フランス大統領ニコラス・サルコジは昨年末に、抗議者たちを威圧して退職年齢を2年切り上げたが、それは2007年にドイツが採用したやり方だった。6月には、スペイン首相ホセ・ルイス・ロドリゲスが、ドイツのように、スペインの慢性化した高い失業率を改善する目的で労働改革法案を議会で通そうとした。しかしドイツに追いつくのは容易ではないだろう。ドイツとその近隣諸国はすべてユーロを使っているので、ユーロ圏の弱体化した経済は、競争力を回復するための最も単純な手段すら実施することができない。その手段とは、通貨の価値を下げることだが(対中国の貿易赤字を減少させるために米国が好んで使った手段だ)、それができない代わりに賃金やコストを抑制しなければならない。

 弱者は強者にならねばならないというユーロ圏に対するドイツの態度は、ヨーロッパの債務危機に対するドイツの対応となって表れた。ドイツ政府はEU内の決定事項に実質上の拒否権を有するのだが、うちひしがれるユーロ圏の盟友諸国に対して、投資家の信頼を取り戻すためには痛みを伴う改革プログラムが必要だと強要した。その見返りとして、ドイツはEUを支援し、昨年5月に国際通貨基金の救済資金を1兆ドル引き出した。しかし救済策とともに実施された予算削減と他の緊縮政策は、ドイツに対する他の諸国からの更なる反発を沸き起こしただけだった。ドイツ人は「ヨーロッパ南部を見て、我々をお荷物だと考えている」と外交担当の欧州理事会マドリード事務局長ホセ・イグナシオ・トレブランカは言う。「ドイツ人は、それぞれが自国の問題を解決する方がいいと考えています。そうすれば自ずと組織はうまくいくのだと」

 多くのエコノミストは、債務危機の解決のためには、債務を抱える政府のための緊急的現金立替だけではなく、より緊密な経済同盟を必要とするだろうと確信している。それでも最近ユーロ圏諸国の政府が声を合わせて支持したユーロ債の要求のように、ドイツ側のより大きな犠牲を伴うユーロ圏の病弊への対処法の提案を、ドイツ首相アンジェラ・メルケルは一貫して抵抗し、あるいは拒絶してきた。確かにメルケルは、贅沢三昧の隣国に自分たちの税金が流用されるのを嫌がるドイツの有権者たちに命運を握られている。しかしヨーロッパ諸国の中には、メルケル首相が、ヨーロッパ全体の利益よりも自己の利害を優先させていると考えるものもいる。ルクセンブルクの首相ジャン・クロード・ユンケルは最近、ドイツを『非ヨーロッパ的』だと非難した。

< 再均衡をとるために >
 このような批判はドイツ政府には堪えるものだ。「我々は、ユーロが平和と自由を維持する手段だと考えています。単なる経済的手段ではありません」とカンピーターは言う。「この手段を安定化させるためなら、我々はどんなことでもします」しかし、ドイツ政府はもっと多くのことをしなければならない。世界のドイツ的問題に対する答えは、世界の中国的問題に対する答えと似ている。両国は再均衡を図り、国内の発展の新たな材料を見つけなければならず、そうすれば世界経済を歪めることもなくなる。

 ドイツの場合には、たとえばルカ・ラコヴィックを助けるようなことだ。49歳の彼は、ベルリンのシーメンス電力設備工場の組み立てラインで25年間働いてきた。自分の仕事が低賃金の中国へと移されるかも知れないことを十分自覚しているので、ラコヴィックと同僚たちは、雇用確保と引き換えに低い賃上げを承認した。昨年末、シーメンスは雇用保障を2013年まで延長した。しかしこの取引(バーゲン)の結果、ラコヴィックはバーゲン品を探し求めることになった。2人の子供を扶養家族に抱え、高くつく買い物は先に延ばしバーゲンセールを捜す。「少しばかり多く稼いで、2年経てば失業する。意味ないよ」と彼は言う。

 中流階層のドイツ人は皆このような選択をし、結果として、ドイツの輸出景気から期待すべき当然の恩恵を享受していない。マーカス・グラブカはベルリンのドイツ経済調査研究所の研究員だが、ドイツ中流階層の可処分所得は過去10年間まったく増加していないと見ている。労働力の約5分の1が不安定で低賃金の仕事に就いていて、多くが1ヶ月にわずか550ドルを稼いでいるに過ぎない、と彼は言う。皮肉なことに、ドイツの輸出ブームに火をつけている要因そのもの、つまりより大きな緩和措置が生み出した低い労働力コストは、米国において緊張を高めることになった同じ方法で、中流階層の福祉厚生を抑制している。その解決は、規制が厳しい国内向け部門を、特に製造部門ほど生産性が高くない教育部門や小売部門を、自由化することかも知れない。それらの産業を自由化することで、より高い賃金の仕事を創出し、ドイツ国民の消費力を押し上げることになるだろう。同時にそれはドイツの輸出依存を相殺することにもなる。「輸出部門という金の卵を産むガチョウを手に入れたのですが、経済が全面的に上手くいくには十分ではありません」とニューヨーク市にある全国産業審議会のチーフエコノミスト、バート・ヴァン・アークは言う。

 ドイツ政府はその事実にはっきりと気づいている。「改革は単に10年の期間限定プログラムではなく、果てしなく続くチャレンジだということを我々は学びました」そうカンピーターは言う。より均衡がとれたドイツは(より均衡がとれた中国に酷似して)、ドイツ経済が世界に与えているマイナス面を最小化し、プラス面を最大化するだろう。たとえば米国は、ドイツの企業や消費者により多くのアメリカ製品を販売することができるだろう。しかし、ドイツに新しく生まれた経済的奇跡が本当に安定するためには、改革推進者の気迫が国境を越えて他国に伝わる必要がある。統合ヨーロッパの中で、「隣国があったとしても」ではなく、ドイツは「隣国と協力してこそ」繁栄できるし、共に繁栄するためには、ドイツ政府が全ユーロ圏の改革や圏内おけるドイツの役割を引き受けなければならない。強いドイツは、ヨーロッパを危機から救い出す牽引車になることができる。もしドイツの指導者が喜んでその機会を捉えるならばだが。「彼らは万人にとっての将来的幸せを推進することができるのです」とトレブランカは言う。「しかし彼らは先頭に立ちたくないのです」もしその態度が変われば、ドイツは恩恵を享受するだろう。そうすればヨーロッパも、そして世界も。

inserted by FC2 system