2012年3月TIMEを読む会



The Strategist
By Fareed Zakaria
Monday, Jan. 30, 2012


In the marathon that is the Republican primary campaign, candidates have tried for months to trip one another up on everything from capitalism to family values in a seemingly unending series of debates. But foreign policy is the one topic that doesn't come up much. This is unusual. In the decades after Vietnam, Republicans never missed an opportunity to talk about global dangers--or pound their Democratic adversaries for being weak-kneed appeasers. These days, however, you could listen for hours to Republicans and hear only an occasional, narrow attack on Barack Obama's handling of American foreign policy.

The main reason, of course, is that the economy is dominating the national conversation. But that isn't the only reason. If Republicans saw opportunities to lash Obama on foreign policy, they would not hold back. In 1980 the economy was miserable, and yet both the primary and general elections were consumed with attacks on Jimmy Carter's policies toward the Soviet Union, Iran and other countries. The reality is that, despite domestic challenges and limited resources, President Obama has pursued an effective foreign policy. In fact, over the past year, Obama's policies have come together in a particularly successful manner. In an op-ed published on Jan. 9 in the Financial Times, Philip Zelikow, a longtime top aide to Condoleezza Rice and one of the brightest Republican policy scholars, described the past year as "the most important in American foreign policy in a decade ... The cumulative boost of American energy and commitment is palpable."

Of course, that is not what the Republican candidates say when they speak on the topic. Mitt Romney, who as the putative front runner has attacked Obama more than all his rivals, charges that Obama is an appeaser who apologizes for America, lacks fortitude and is "tentative, indecisive, timid and nuanced." This generic and somewhat vague critique follows the familiar Republican narrative, but it's unlikely to stick, especially with general-election voters. Even before the torrent of drone attacks that crippled al-Qaeda, even before the killing of Osama bin Laden, even before Libya, most Americans gave Obama positive marks for his handling of foreign policy. (His approval rating is currently at 52%.) Republicans have made specific charges in a few areas--Israel and Iran--mostly in the hope that they can cement support in one key constituency (Evangelicals) and woo another (Jewish Americans), but even there, the polls suggest that most Americans are content with Obama's approach.

Foreign policy is not a popularity contest, but it is historically significant that the Republican Party, which since the Nixon era has enjoyed a clear advantage on foreign policy issues, will enter the 2012 race without any such boost. That may be partly because of the failures of George W. Bush, but it is also because Obama has handled the terrain deftly. And he has done so with a team not of rivals but of heavyweights who could have been difficult to manage. Among the President's core foreign policy advisers for most of his first three years were two people he ran against in the 2008 primary campaign (Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden), a Defense chief inherited from his Republican predecessor (Robert Gates) and a general who is reported to have disagreed with him on Iraq and Afghanistan (David Petraeus). That they mostly agree on broad policy helps, but it is still a team that has worked well together, in some measure because of the understated but highly effective National Security Adviser, Thomas Donilon.

Columnist Walter Lippmann once wrote that "foreign policy consists in bringing into balance, with a comfortable surplus of power in reserve, the nation's commitments and the nation's power." From 2001, the U.S. went though a decade of massive foreign commitments and interventions, which proved enormously expensive in blood and treasure--and highly unpopular around the world. This overextension was followed by an economic crisis that drained American power. The result was a foreign policy that was insolvent. Obama came into office determined to pare down excess commitments, regain goodwill and refocus the U.S. on core missions to achieve a more stable and sustainable global position.

Obama can take credit for having achieved much along these lines. But to leave a more lasting legacy than one of focus, effectiveness and good public diplomacy, he will need to build on his successes and conceive and implement a set of policies that promote a vision of a better world--more stable, more open and more free. Good foreign policy Presidents (like Dwight Eisenhower and George H.W. Bush) managed a complex set of challenges expertly, making few costly errors. Bad ones (like George W. Bush and Lyndon Johnson) made mistakes that cost America in lives, treasure and prestige. But great foreign policy Presidents (like Harry Truman) created enduring structures and relationships that produced lasting peace and prosperity. Obama has been a good foreign policy President; he has the opportunity to become a great one.

The Obama Doctrine
Candidates on the campaign trail usually say about foreign policy what seems politically advantageous, only to discover that they don't actually believe any of it once in office. George W. Bush's only foreign policy statements of note during his campaign were to criticize American arrogance and nation-building. Once he became President, however, as events presented themselves, he realized that he actually liked speaking about America as a nation chosen by God and history to lead the world. And he launched the most extensive nation-building project in U.S. history since Vietnam. Mitt Romney's statements on, say, the Taliban and Iran tell us nothing more than that he has found a place to outflank Obama.

The President, on the other hand, came into office with a set of beliefs about the world that he has tried to act upon. Chief among them is that over the past decade, the U.S. has wasted its power and prestige on an intervention in Iraq that he believed was an expensive mistake and a major distraction. In office, Obama stuck to his view despite pressure to do otherwise, and in a disciplined manner, he drew down American forces in Iraq, from 142,000 when he took office to zero as of a few weeks ago. When I asked Obama on the campaign trail in 2008 which President's foreign policy he admired, he immediately chose George H.W. Bush, a President known as a foreign policy realist, whose watchwords were prudence, cost-effectiveness, diplomacy and restraint. James Baker, Bush's Secretary of State, has admitted to approving of Obama's approach to international relations.

In contrast with his policy on Iraq, Obama argued for a buildup of forces in Afghanistan. But even there, he sought to end the more expansive aspects of the mission, focusing the fight on counterterrorism against al-Qaeda and similar groups, whether in Afghanistan, Pakistan or Yemen. The alternative, a war of counterinsurgency in Afghanistan, could easily morph into an open-ended nation-building project in one of the poorest countries in the world. Several Administration officials privately confirm that from the start Obama wanted to pare down the mission in Afghanistan to a fight against terrorist groups. He either was outmaneuvered by the military or decided to accept its advice for a surge. In the end, he acceded to an 18-month buildup to hammer the Taliban into negotiations and announced last June that the U.S. would begin drawing down 10,000 troops in Afghanistan by the end of 2011 and an additional 23,000 by the end of the summer of 2012, leaving 68,000 troops in the country. Meanwhile, he embraced counterterrorism with ferocity, dramatically expanding the campaign of special operations and drone attacks that have since killed most of al-Qaeda's senior leaders--almost all of whom lived in Pakistan. The crowning success of this strategy was the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan and his assassination. (Of course, as with all successful counterterrorism, the strategy seems foolproof in retrospect. Had these various missions failed, had many American soldiers died, those tactics would have been called dangerous and foolhardy.) In the central battle in the war on terrorism, Obama adopted many of the Bush Administration's aggressive tactics, used them more aggressively and achieved greater success. Republicans find it difficult to attack Obama credibly on the core issue of fighting America's enemies because he outflanked them on the right.

When asked to describe the Obama Doctrine, the President has chosen not to respond directly, but he explained that he believes the U.S. must act with other countries. "[Mine is] an American leadership that recognizes the rise of countries like China, India and Brazil. It's a U.S. leadership that recognizes our limits in terms of resources and capacity," he told TIME. That multilateral approach--listening to others, being aware of their national pride and interests and ego--is surely a product of his worldly background, with a Kenyan father, an Indonesian stepfather and a mother who was a serious student of global development. It has shown results. Obama told other countries to step up during the Libyan crisis if they expected American help. This was caricatured by some as "leading from behind," but really it forced others to act on an issue that the U.S. did not see as central to its national security. If France and Britain saw Libya as vital, he implied, they needed to put their money and militaries where their mouths were. In Asia, Obama let countries ask for American involvement rather than rushing forward to propose it. Countries are more willing to accept American leadership if Washington is patient enough to let them request it.

In an area that he does deem vital, Obama has shown himself willing to be extremely tough. Having tried to negotiate with the Iranians and been spurned by them, the Administration intensified the pressure on Tehran. It has ratcheted up sanctions, stepped up cooperation with the Israeli government and the Gulf Arab states and put in place even more crippling sanctions to pile up the costs on Iran. None of this would have been possible without significant multilateral diplomacy. The Chinese and Russians signed on to new sanctions at the U.N. (which ensures that they get enforced worldwide). Washington's European and East Asian allies have gone further in cutting off economic ties with Iran. Observing the results, Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, perhaps the world's leading hawk on Iran--and no fan of the President--admitted on Jan. 14 that the pressure was having an effect, that Iran was "wobbling" and that this kind of tough containment might actually work.

A great deal of foreign policy is crisis management. "Stuff happens," the President said, "and you have to respond." Iran's Green movement and the Arab Spring were challenging and unexpected events, and the Obama Administration made a strategic distinction between the two. On Iran, while offering rhetorical support, the White House seemed to have concluded that the regime would be able to suppress the Green movement--which turned out to be an accurate diagnosis. In the cases of Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, the Administration concluded that the democracy protests had become unstoppable and the regimes were doomed. It took Ronald Reagan two years from the beginning of the democracy protests in the Philippines to break with Ferdinand Marcos. In 1997 when protests began in Indonesia, it took Bill Clinton a year to urge President Suharto to resign. In 2011 it took Obama two weeks to urge Hosni Mubarak to leave office. By placing the U.S. on the right side of a historical wave, Obama took it out of the Egyptian political debate. Egyptians know they will succeed or fail at their democratic experiment because of themselves and not Washington. In a Middle East that believes that America conspires and controls all, that's a step forward.

There have been misses. Whatever your view of the Israeli-Palestinian problem, it is difficult to see Obama's approach as a success. The fundamental issue there remains that neither party is inclined toward or capable of making peace right now. Israel is ruled by a right-wing coalition that would collapse if it tried for peace and a Prime Minister who most certainly does not want to. Palestine is divided between two groups, one of which explicitly rejects peace with Israel. In this context, to put American prestige on the line in the hope that a few words or nudges would transform the situation seems naive. It would have been better to have continued with what appeared to be Obama's initial strategy: appoint a special envoy so the world knows that Washington wants a deal--but commit no presidential capital in a situation that seemed destined for stagnation.

One could add others. Relations with Iran could explode as pressure builds (and oil prices rise) without any discernible diplomatic path toward a nuclear deal. The current policy assumes that Iran will capitulate or that, having described the situation in dire terms, the Obama Administration would take even more dramatic steps, perhaps including a military attack on the country. Neither scenario appears likely, and neither side seems to be working to construct a third.

The Asian Opportunity
Crisis management, effective or ineffective, is not strategy. Obama has been determined to draw down America's military interventions and limit its commitments in places like Iraq and even Afghanistan so that he could focus U.S. foreign policy on America's core interests. These he has defined as its dealings with the great powers and its embrace of larger global issues. He has reset relations with Russia, built on the growing ties with India, established a close working relationship with Turkey and maintained the historical connections with European allies. But the biggest upgrade in U.S. relations has been in Asia. The strategy of "rebalancing" might well be the centerpiece of Obama's foreign policy and what historians will point to when searching for an Obama Doctrine. It is premised on a simple, powerful recognition. The center of global economic power is shifting east. In 10 years, three of the world's five largest economies will be in Asia: China, Japan and India. The greatest political tensions and struggles might also be in Asia as these countries seek political, cultural and military power as well. If the U.S. is going to be the central global power, it will need to be a Pacific power.

In a speech to the Australian parliament, Obama signaled America's intent. "The United States is a Pacific power, and we are here to stay," he said. The President promised that despite serious defense cuts that would affect all aspects of the military, there would be no cuts in Asia. Over the past year, the Administration launched a series of diplomatic efforts that culminated at year's end with a flurry of initiatives. The U.S. will establish a military base (of sorts) in Australia, expanding its reach in the Pacific. It has launched a transpacific trade accord, which, if negotiated, would be the largest trade deal since NAFTA. It re-established ties with Burma, thus gaining influence with a pivotal country that borders China and India. And it partnered with other Asian countries at the East Asian summit to limit Chinese influence and claims on the South China Sea.

The pivot to Asia has been highly effective, taking advantage of China's belligerence. But the Administration must now work to build an affirmative vision of an Asia that is not banded together against China but rather is open, diverse and plural. The real challenge is to convince China that it benefits from the stability, rules and prosperity that such a vision would produce (just as Germany benefited from a peaceful and prosperous Europe with it at the center) and to persuade the Chinese that they are better off with such an Asia than one characterized by geopolitical competition. So far, Washington's relations with China have not reached the level of serious strategic dialogue that will be necessary to achieve any true global cooperation in the years ahead. Going forward, U.S. security and prosperity depends on a productive relationship with China more than with any other country.

The challenge with China is the challenge with other great powers--and with Obama's foreign policy in general. It is worthwhile to have good relations with countries. But it is crucial to have good relations in the service of a broader vision of a world that is characterized by increasing levels of openness, economic interdependence, international cooperation, peace, prosperity and liberty. Over the past 60 years, the U.S. has helped build an international order characterized by institutions, policies, norms and best practices. The hundreds of organizations that help coordinate countries' policies on everything from trade to disease prevention to environmental protection are all new creatures in international life, and they have created a world of greater peace and prosperity than humans have even known. But this world needs shoring up as new nations rise to power. The challenge for the U.S. is to make a stable structure for the world that all the newly emerging powers can buy into and uphold. That means revitalizing global trade, pushing through on a nuclear-nonproliferation agenda, working to integrate the emerging powers and, perhaps crucially, articulating a vision of this world.

Henry Kissinger once said that the test for a statesman was to find the place between stagnation and overextension. Good tactics alone would leave you reacting to events and stagnant in the stream of history. Too vast a vision would leave you overextended, exhausted and inviting adversaries. Barack Obama is already pointed in the right direction on foreign policy. The challenge for him is to find the sweet spot.

The Strategist
< 戦略家バラク・オバマ >
バラク・オバマが優れた対外政策を持った大統領かどうかが問題なのではない。偉大な大統領になり得るかどうかだ。
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

長期にわたる共和党予備選挙で、何か月間も果てしなく続くような論争を繰り広げ、資本主義から家族の価値観まで多岐にわたって、相手のアラを捜してきた。しかし対外政策に関しては、さほど話題になっていない。通常では考えられないことだ。ベトナム戦争以降何十年も、共和党は世界の危険について語る機会を、あるいは政敵・民主党がヘナチョコの融和主義者だと非難する機会を決して見逃さなかった。しかし今日では、何時間も共和党の演説を聞くだろうが、ほんの時折しかオバマの対外政策を非難するのを耳にしない。

 もちろんその主たる理由は、経済問題が国民の関心の中心となっているからだ。しかしそれだけが理由ではない。もしオバマ大統領の対外政策を攻撃するネタを見つけたら、共和党は手控えなどしないだろう。1980年の経済は最悪だったが、それでも予備選挙と総選挙は、ソビエト連邦、イラン、その他の諸国に対するジミー・カーターの対外政策への攻撃に終始した。現実を見れば、国内の諸問題やエネルギー問題を抱えていながらも、オバマ大統領は有効的な対外政策を推進してきている。事実、昨年を通じて、全体的にオバマの諸政策は特に成功しているといえる。1月9日号「ファイナンシャルタイムズ」の論説で、 長年コンドリーザ・ライスの最高顧問を務めた最精鋭の共和党政治学者であるフィリップ・ゼリコウは、「10年間の米国対外政策において最も重要な年であり・・・これまで蓄積されてきた米国の行動力と関与が一気に上昇したことは明らかだ」とこの1年を評価した。  

もちろん、共和党候補者がこの話題に触れる時には、そんなことは言わない。ミット・ロムニーは共和党最有力候補者だと言われていて、候補者の中でオバマを最も激しく攻撃してきたが、オバマは米国のために頭を垂れる融和主義者だ、豪胆さに欠け、『及び腰、不決断、臆病、曖昧』だと非難する。共和党お決まりの言葉の後に、こんな一般的で何の特徴もない批判が続くのだが、大してインパクトはなく、特に総選挙の有権者には響かないようだ。アルカイダ勢力を叩いた猛烈な無人機攻撃の以前でさえ、オサマ・ビンラディン殺害の以前でさえ、リビアの以前でさえ、ほとんどの米国人は、対外政策を扱うオバマの手腕に肯定的評価を与えていた(現時点でオバマの支持率は52%)。共和党はイスラエルやイランといった2~3の分野で具体的な批判を行ってきたが、それは主力となる選挙民(キリスト教福音派)の支持を固め、後一つの選挙民(ユダヤ系米国人)の支持を取り込もうというのが狙いであり、これらの問題でさえ圧倒的米国人がオバマの政策を支持している、と世論調査に表れている。  

対外政策は人気投票ではないとはいえ、ニクソン時代から対外政策では明らかに優位に展開してきた共和党が、この問題での攻撃的勢いがないまま2012年選挙戦に突入していくだろうことは、歴史的に重要な意味を持つ。その理由の一つにジョージ・W.ブッシュの失敗が挙げられるが、同時に、オバマがこの分野を巧みに処理してきたことがある。ライバルとチームを組んだだけではなく、一緒にやっていくのがさぞかし難しかっただろう重鎮たちとチームを組んで、しかも上手くやってきたのだ。2008年予備選挙で対抗馬だった2人(ヒラリー・クリントンとジョー・バイデン)、共和党前任者から継続就任した国防長官(ロバート・ゲイツ)、そしてイラク・アフガニスタン問題でオバマと意見を異にすると報道されている将軍(デビッド・ペトラウス中央軍司令官)、これらの人物はほぼ最初の3年間、大統領対外政策主力顧問団のメンバーだった。広範な政策に彼らがほとんど同意していることは、オバマの助けになっているが、チームが一丸となって機能していることは大きく、幾分は、地味だが非常に実践力がある国家安全保障問題担当大統領補佐官トーマス・ドニロンの存在がある。

 コラムニスト、ウォルター・リップマンはかつて次のように書いた。「対外政策とは、安心できる予備能力を蓄えておくこと、つまり国家的関与と国家的能力の均衡を上手くとることにある」それにも関わらず2001年以降10年間、米国は外国に対して莫大な関与と介入を行うことによって、計り知れないほどの人命と資金の代償を支払うことになった。しかも国際的に大きな不名誉を被った。このような過剰な覇権は、米国の国力を削ぐ経済危機をもたらした。その結果は破産国家の対外政策だった。オバマが就任したとき、過剰な関与から手を引き、友好関係を取り戻し、より安定した長期的に維持できる国際的地位を獲得するための核心的政策に重点を置いて、米国を軌道修正しようと固く決意していた。

 このような政治方針に沿って多くを達成してきたと、オバマ大統領は胸を張っていい。しかし長く後世に業績を残すためには、集中、効果、良質な大衆民主主義の1つでは足りず、自らの成功に立脚し、より良い世界のヴィジョンを高く掲げた一連の政策を考え、実行する必要があるだろう。より良い世界とは、より安定した、より開かれた、より自由な世界だ。できの良い対外政策の大統領(ドワイト・アイゼンハワー:1953~61やジョージH.W.ブッシュ:1989~93)は、大きな犠牲もなく無難に、一連の複雑な問題を処理した。できの悪い対外政策の大統領(ジョージW.ブッシュ:2001~09やリンドン・ジョンソン:1963~69)は、国民の生命、財政、名声を窮地に立たせるという誤謬を犯した。一方で偉大な対外政策の大統領(ハリー・トルーマン:1945~53)は、恒久的平和と繁栄を産みだす揺るぎない体制と関係性を構築した。オバマはこれまで、できの良い対外政策の大統領だった。彼には偉大な対外政策の大統領になる可能性がある。

< オバマ・ドクトリン >  
選挙戦を続ける候補者は、対外政策を語る時、常に政治的に有利になると思う内容を取り上げるが、いったん就任すると、実際には何一つそんなことを本気で考えていないことが明らかになるものだ。ジョージW.ブッシュの選挙中に行った唯一の主たる対外政策に関する発言は、アメリカ人の傲慢さと国家建設を批判することだった。しかし大統領になると、何につけても剥き出しになっていたが、米国は世界を導くために神と歴史によって選ばれし国だと説くことが本当は大好きだったんだと、本人が自覚した。かくしてベトナム戦争以降の米国史上で最も覇権的な国家建設プロジェクトに乗り出すことになった。ミット・ロムニーが行ったタリバンやイランに関する発言といえば、オバマを姑息にやっつけるためのものでしかないことがわかる。

 一方オバマ大統領は、変えたいと思う世界についての確固とした信念を抱いて大統領に就任した。その中でも中心的なものは、過去10年に亘ってイラクの介入のために国力と名声を無駄にし、多額の軍事費を注入した誤謬であり、混乱でしかなかった、と信じていることだった。執務室の中にあって、それ以外の方法を選択せよという圧力があるにも関わらず自らの信念を曲げず、毅然とした態度で、就任時点で142,000だったイラクの米軍兵力を撤退させ、数週間前の時点でゼロにした。2008年の選挙戦の間に、どの大統領の対外政策を評価するかとオバマに尋ねたとき、現実的対外政策をとることで知られており、分別、費用効果、外交術、自制をモットーとするジョージH.W.ブッシュの名を即座に挙げた。ブッシュ政権時代の国務長官ジェームス・ベーカーは、オバマの国際関係の方針を支持することを認めた。

 対イラク政策とは逆に、オバマはアフガニスタンの兵力を増強することを主張した。しかし増強方針を採用するにしても、介入がさらに拡大していく傾向はくい止める方途を探り、アフガン、パキスタン、あるいはイエメンであっても、アルカイダや派生グループに対する対テロ戦に兵力を集中させた。そういった意味でのアフガニスタンの対ゲリラ戦は、世界の最貧国の一つであってみれば、際限のない国家建設プロジェクトへと容易に変容しかねない。何人かの政府高官が非公式に語ったところでは、オバマは就任当初から、アフガニスタンでの戦いを、対テロ戦という枠に限定していこうと考えていた。軍部がオバマを上手く手玉に取ったのか、あるいは軍部の増派のアドバイスをオバマ自身が受け入れようと決断したのか。最終的に、オバマは18月間の兵力増強に同意し、タリバンを説得して交渉に着かせ、アフガンにおける米軍兵力を2011年末には10,000を、2012年夏の終わりにはさらに23,000を撤退させ、68,000の兵力をアフガンに残留させる、と昨年6月に発表した。一方で対テロ戦には獰猛さを加えることをあえて選び、特殊攻撃部隊の急展開と無人戦闘機による攻撃を実行し、その後、ほぼ全員がパキスタンにいたアルカイダ幹部のほとんど殺害した。この戦術の最高の成功は、パキスタンに潜伏するオサマ・ビンラディンの隠れ家を急襲し、ビンラディンを暗殺したことだった(もちろん成功に終わった対テロ戦のすべてに言えることだが、後から考えれば、この戦術は成功間違いないものに思える。これらの様々な任務がもし失敗していたら、もし多くの米兵が戦死していたら、作戦は危険で無謀なものだと言われたことだろう)。対テロ戦争の中心的戦いで、オバマはブッシュ政権の積極的作戦の多くを採用し、ブッシュ以上に攻撃的に実行し、ブッシュ以上に大きな成功を収めた。共和党員は、米国の敵と戦う核心問題で、オバマに対して説得力のある攻撃ができない。なぜなら、オバマはタカ派的に敵をやっつけたからだ。

 オバマ・ドクトリンはどんなものかと大統領に尋ねると、直対応は避けながら、米国は他の諸国と共に行動すべきだと考えると説明した。「(私のドクトリンは)中国、インド、ブラジルのような諸国の新興を認めた上で、米国がリーダーシップをとることです。資金と能力からみて我々に限界があることを認めた上での、米国のリーダーシップです」とタイムに語った。他国の主張を聴き、彼らの国家としての誇りと利益と自我を念頭に置きながら行う多方向的アプローチは、ケニア人の父と、インドネシア人の養父と、国際開発を学ぶまじめな学生を母に持つという、国際的背景を持った賜物であるのは確かだ。その成果は表れている。オバマは、もし他国が米国の援助を期待するなら、リビア危機の渦中で自ら行動を強化すべきだと告げた。『背後から操っている』と揶揄する者もいたが、自国の国家的安全の核心だと考えない問題に対しては、他国に行動を起こすように強いた。もしフランスとイギリスがリビアを不可欠だと考えるなら、口先だけではなく資金と軍隊を両国が投入しなければならない、とオバマは言いたいのだ。アジアでは、自ら性急に介入に走るのではなく、アジア諸国が米国の介入を求める声を上げるようにもっていく。米国政府が忍耐強く求めを待つなら、アジア諸国はより進んで米国のリーダーシップを受け入れるだろう。

 オバマが不可欠だと考える地域では、あえて自らを極端なまでにタフな姿勢で押し出してきた。イラン人と交渉しようと努力して拒絶されたとき、オバマ政権はイラン政府にさらに強い圧力をかけた。経済制裁を強化し、イスラエル政府や湾岸アラブ諸国との協調姿勢を強め、さらに厳しい制裁を加えてイランに深刻な打撃を与えた。もし効果的な多方向的外交がなければ、どれ一つとして実現しなかっただろう。中国とロシアは国連の新経済制裁案を承認した(これによって新経済制裁は国際的効果を高めた)。米国政府のヨーロッパと東アジアとの同盟関係はさらに進化し、イランとの経済関係を絶つまでになった。これらの結果を睨みながら1月14日になって、イラン問題では世界で最たるタカ派でありオバマ嫌いと言われるベンジャミン・ネタニヤフ、イスラエル首相は、制裁措置が効果を表わし、イランが『グラついている』こと、またこの種の手厳しい封じ込め政策が実効的だと認めた。

 対外政策の圧倒的部分が危機管理だ。「事が起これば、対応しなければなりません」と大統領は言った。イランのグリーン・ムーブメントやアラブの春は、困難な戦いであり予期せぬ事件だったが、オバマ政権はこの2つの出来事を戦略的に区別している。イランに対しては、文言上の支持を与えながらも、イラン政権はグリーン・ムーブメントを抑え込めるとホワイトハウスは判断したようだ――そしてこの判断は正しかった。チュニジア、エジプト、リビアについては、民主主義的抵抗運動は止められず、政権は倒れると米国政府は結論付けた。フィリピンで民主主義的抵抗運動が始まってからフェルディナンド・マルコスが倒れるまで、ロナルド・レーガンは2年を要した。1997年にインドネシアで抵抗運動が起きたとき、スハルト大統領を辞任に追い込むまで、ビル・クリントンは1年かかった。2011年、ホスニ・ムバラク辞任までオバマは2週間かけた。オバマは、歴史の流れの中で米国を正当な側に置くことによって、エジプトの政治論争から身を引かせた。自分たちの民主主義的試みが成功するか失敗するかは、米国政府ではなく自分たち自身の掌中にあるとエジプト民衆は知っている。米国が陰謀によってすべてを牛耳ると考えている中東においては、これは一歩前進だ。

失敗があった。イスラエル・パレスチナ問題に対する見解がどうであれ、オバマの路線が成功だったとは思えない。双方が直ちに平和を志向する気がない、あるいは平和を産みだす力がない、というところに根本的な問題がある。もし和平へ踏み出したら崩壊するような、そして最も和平を望んでいないのが首相その人であるような右翼連立政権にイスラエルは統治されている。パレスチナは2派に分裂していて、その一方は公然とイスラエルとの和平を拒絶している。ちょっとした言葉や後押しで状況が変えられるという望みに米国の威信を託すのは、あまりに読みが甘いようだ。オバマがとった初期の戦略だと思われるもの、つまり特別大使を任命して米国が交渉を望んでいることを世界にアピールする、しかし行き詰まりが見えているような状況で自らの手を汚すことになる、そんな戦略を継続したほうが良かっただろう。

もう一つ問題が加わりそうだ。イランとの諸関係は、軋轢が増すにつれて(また原油価格の上昇があり)、核交渉に向けての眼に見える外交的伸展がないまま一触即発の状態だ。イランが降伏するか、さもなければ、絶望的な言葉を使えば、オバマ政権による対イラン軍事攻撃という選択肢も含んだより大胆な一歩を踏み出すか、というのが現在の政治状況だ。どちらのシナリオもありそうもないが、イスラエルとパレスチナは共に第三の道を見出す努力をしそうにもない。

< アジアの可能性 >
効果的か否かは別にして、危機管理は戦略ではない。対外政策を米国の核心的利益に焦点を合わせるために、イラクやたとえアフガニスタンであっても、米国の軍事介入を削減し、関与を制限しようとオバマは決意した。これらの方針をオバマは、超大国との付き合い方、そしてより大きな国際問題の引き受け方だと意味づけした。ロシアとの関係を見直し、インドとの連携を深め、トルコとの緊密な実務関係を強化し、ヨーロッパ同盟との伝統的関係を維持した。しかし最高に強化された米国との関係はアジアにおいてだった。「リバランス」戦略は、オバマの対外政策であり、オバマ・ドクトリンを考える時に歴史家が指摘することになるものだろう。それは明快で強力な認識を前提とする。世界の経済力の中心は東方へと移りつつある。10年の内に、世界5大経済力の3つがアジアに存在することになるだろう。中国、日本、インドだ。これらの諸国は政治的、文化的、軍事的力も同時に求めるので、アジアにおける政治的緊張と紛争は最大限に高まるかもしれない。もしも米国が最大の世界的大国になろうと考えるなら、太平洋における大国になる必要があるだろう。

オーストラリア議会へのスピーチで、オバマは米国の意図を明確にした。「米国は太平洋国家だ。そして我々が存在すべき場所はここだ」と彼は述べた。全ての軍事面に影響を与える深刻な軍事予算削減にも関わらず、アジア地域での削減はありえないことをオバマは約束した。過去1年に亘って、オバマ政権は次々と外交努力に乗りだし、相次ぐ戦略が年末に頂点に達した。米国はオーストラリアに軍事基地(らしきもの)を建設し、その影響力を太平用地域に拡大するだろう。環太平洋貿易協定の締結を推し進め、もし合意すればNAFTAに次ぐ最大の貿易協定になるだろう。ビルマとの貿易関係を再開し、中国やインドと国境を接する中軸的な国への影響力を手に入れた。そして南シナ海への中国の影響力や主権の主張を封じるために、東アジアサミットで他のアジア諸国とパートナーを組んだ。

中国の好戦的態度を利用し、アジアの要になるには非常に効果的だった。しかし今やオバマ政権は、中国に対抗して結束するのではなく、むしろオープンで、多彩で、複合的な、アジアとしての肯定的視野を創るために努力しなければならない。真の試練は、そのような視野が産みだす安定、統治、繁栄から恩恵を得ることができると中国を納得させ(ちょうどドイツが中心的存在になることでヨーロッパの平和と繁栄から恩恵を享受したように)、地政学的対立があるアジアよりも、そんなアジアの方が幸せになれるのだと中国民衆を説得することだ。今のところ、米国政府の中国との関係は、これから先数年間の真の国際的協調に到達するために必要な真剣な戦略的話し合いのレベルには達していない。将来的には、米国の安全と繁栄は、どこよりもまず中国との生産的関係にかかっている。

中国との関係で経験する困難は、他の超大国との関係で経験する困難であり、一般的なオバマの対外政策での困難でもある。他国とのいい関係を保つのは重要なことだ。しかし、開放性、経済的独立性、国際的協調、平和、繁栄、自由の質が上がっていくのが明確に見られる、より視野の広い世界観を持って行動する中でいい関係を保つことは重要だ。過去60年に亘って米国は、機構、政策、規範そして最良の実践を特徴とする国際秩序を構築することに貢献してきた。貿易から疾病予防、そして環境保護に至るまで、すべての領域の国家政策を調整するために働く何百もの組織はすべて国際社会の新しい創造物であり、これらの組織は人類がかつて知らなかったような最高の平和と繁栄を誇る世界を創りだした。しかし新しい諸国家が発展し力を持ってくるときには、支援しなければならない。米国にとっての挑戦は、全ての新興国が受け入れ、支持できる世界のための安定した環境を作ることだ。つまり、国際貿易を再活性化し、核不拡散の取り組みを断行し、新興諸国を融合させるために行動する、そしておそらくこれが不可欠だろうが、このような世界のヴィジョンを明確に示すことだ。

ヘンリー・キッシンジャーがかつて、優れた政治家にとっての試練は、沈滞と過剰な拡大との間の妥協点を見つけることだ、と言った。あまりに大きなヴィジョンは、手を伸ばし過ぎて疲弊し、敵を作り出すだけだ。バラク・オバマは対外政策ではすでに正しい方向に向かっている。彼にとっての試練は、その急所を捉えることだ。

'I Made a Commitment to Change the Trajectory Of American Foreign Policy'
By Fareed Zakaria
Monday, Jan. 30, 2012


When we talked when you were campaigning for the presidency, I asked you which Administration's foreign policy you admired. And you said that you looked at George H.W. Bush's diplomacy. Now that you are President, how has your thinking evolved?

It is true that I've been complimentary of George H.W. Bush's foreign policy, and I continue to believe that he managed a very difficult period very effectively. Now that I've been in office for three years, I think that--I'm always cautious about comparing what we've done to what others have done, just because each period is unique, each set of challenges is unique. But what I can say is that I made a commitment to change the trajectory of American foreign policy in a way that would end the war in Iraq, refocus on defeating our primary enemy, al-Qaeda, strengthen our alliances and our leadership in multilateral fora and restore American leadership in the world. And I think we have accomplished those principal goals. It's an American leadership that recognizes the rise of countries like China, India and Brazil. It's a U.S. leadership that recognizes our limits in terms of resources and capacity. And yet what I think we've been able to establish is a clear belief among other nations that the United States continues to be the one indispensable nation in tackling major international problems. We still have huge challenges ahead, and one thing I've learned over the last three years is that as much as you'd like to guide events, stuff happens. And you have to respond, and those responses, no matter how effective your diplomacy or your foreign policy, are sometimes going to produce less-than-optimal results. But our overall trajectory, our overall strategy, has been very successful.

Mitt Romney says you are timid, indecisive and nuanced.

I think Mr. Romney and the rest of the Republican field are going to be playing to their base until the primary season is over. Once it is, we'll have a serious debate about foreign policy. I will feel very confident about being able to put my record before the American people and saying that America is safer, stronger and better-positioned to win the future than it was when I came into office. And there are going to be some issues where people may have some legitimate differences, and there are going to be some serious debates, just because they're hard issues. But overall, I think it's going to be pretty hard to argue that we have not executed a strategy over the last three years that has put America in a stronger position than it was when I came into office.

With all this pressure that you have been able to put on Iran--and the economic pressure--suppose the consequence is that the price of oil keeps rising but Iran does not make any significant concessions. Won't it be fair to say that the policy will have failed?

It is fair to say that this isn't an easy problem. And anybody who claims otherwise doesn't know what they're talking about. Obviously Iran sits in a volatile region during a volatile period of time. Their own internal conflicts make it that much more difficult, I think, for them to make big strategic decisions. Having said that, our goal consistently has been to combine pressure with an opportunity for them to make good decisions and to mobilize the international community to maximize that pressure. Can we guarantee that Iran takes the smarter path? No, which is why I've repeatedly said we don't take any options off the table in preventing them from getting a nuclear weapon.

When you look at Afghanistan over the past three years--the policies you've adopted--would it be fair to say that the counterterrorism part of the policy, the killing of bad guys, has been a lot more successful than the counterinsurgency, the stabilizing of vast aspects of the country?

What is fair to say is that the counterterrorism strategy as applied to al-Qaeda has been extremely successful. The job's not finished, but there's no doubt that we have severely degraded al-Qaeda's capacity. When it comes to stabilizing Afghanistan, that was always going to be a more difficult and messy task, because it's not just military--it's economic, it's political, it's dealing with the capacity of an Afghan government that doesn't have a history of projecting itself into all parts of the country, tribal and ethnic conflicts that date back centuries ... I never believed that America could essentially deliver peace and prosperity to all of Afghanistan in a three-, four-, five-year time frame. And I think anybody who believed that didn't know the history and the challenges facing Afghanistan, because they're the third poorest country in the world, with one of the lowest literacy rates and no significant history of a strong civil service or an economy that was deeply integrated with the world economy. It's going to take decades for Afghanistan to fully achieve its potential.

As the Chinese watched your most recent diplomacy in Asia, is it fair for them to conclude, as many Chinese scholars have, that the United States is building a containment policy against China?

No, I think that would not be accurate, and I've specifically rejected that formulation. We've sent a clear signal that we are a Pacific power, that we will continue to be a Pacific power. But we've done this all in the context of a belief that a peacefully rising China is good for everybody. The only thing we've insisted on, as a principle in that region, is, everybody's got to play by the same set of rules. That's not unique to China. That's true for all of us.

You have developed a reputation for managing your foreign policy team very effectively, without dissension. So how come you can manage this fairly complex process so well, and relations with Congress are not so good?

When I'm working with my foreign policy team, there's just not a lot of extraneous noise. There's not a lot of posturing and positioning and "How's this going to play on cable news?" and "Can we score some points here?" That whole political circus that has come to dominate so much of Washington applies less to the foreign policy arena, which is why I could forge such an effective working relationship and friendship with Bob Gates, who comes out of that tradition, even though I'm sure he would've considered himself a pretty conservative, hawkish Republican. At least that was where he was coming out of. I never asked him what his current party affiliation was, because it didn't matter. I just knew he was going to give me good advice.

But have you been able to forge similar relationships with foreign leaders? Because one of the criticisms people make about your style of diplomacy is that it's very cool, it's aloof, that you don't pal around with these guys.

I wasn't in other Administrations, so I didn't see the interactions between U.S. Presidents and various world leaders. But the friendships and the bonds of trust that I've been able to forge with a whole range of leaders is precisely, or is a big part of, what has allowed us to execute effective diplomacy. I think that if you ask them, Angela Merkel or Prime Minister Singh or President Lee or Prime Minister Erdogan or David Cameron would say, We have a lot of trust and confidence in the President. We believe what he says. We believe that he'll follow through on his commitments ... That's part of the reason we've been able to forge these close working relationships and gotten a whole bunch of stuff done.

You just can't do it with John Boehner.

You know, the truth is, actually, when it comes to Congress, the issue is not personal relationships. My suspicion is that this whole critique has to do with the fact that I don't go to a lot of Washington parties. And as a consequence, the Washington press corps maybe just doesn't feel like I'm in the mix enough with them, and they figure, well, if I'm not spending time with them, I must be cold and aloof. The fact is, I've got a 13-year-old and 10-year-old daughter, and so, no, Michelle and I don't do the social scene, because as busy as we are, we have a limited amount of time, and we want to be good parents at a time that's vitally important for our kids. In terms of Congress, the reason we're not getting enough done right now is you've got a Congress that is deeply ideological and sees a political advantage in not getting stuff done. John Boehner and I get along fine. We had a great time playing golf together. That's not the issue. The problem was that no matter how much golf we played or no matter how much we yukked it up, he had trouble getting his caucus to go along with doing the responsible thing on a whole bunch of issues over the past year.

You talked a lot about how foreign policy ultimately has to derive from American strength, and so when I talk to businessmen, a lot of them are dismayed that you have not signaled to the world and to markets that the U.S. will get its fiscal house in order by embracing your deficit commission, the Simpson-Bowles. And that walking away from that, which is a phrase I've heard a lot, has been a very bad signal to the world. Why won't you embrace Simpson-Bowles?

First of all, I did embrace Simpson-Bowles. I'm the one who created the commission. If I hadn't pushed it, it wouldn't have happened, because congressional sponsors, including a whole bunch of Republicans, walked away from it ... Now, to your larger point, you're absolutely right. Our whole foreign policy has to be anchored in economic strength here at home. And if we are not strong, stable, growing, making stuff, training our workforce so that it's the most skilled in the world, maintaining our lead in innovation, in basic research, in basic science, in the quality of our universities, in the transparency of our financial sector, if we don't maintain the upward mobility and equality of opportunity that underwrites our political stability and makes us a beacon for the world, then our foreign policy leadership will diminish as well.

≪ 私は米国の対外政策路線を変えようと誓った ≫
大統領執務室でのオバマ大統領の談話。
タイム誌ファリード・ザカリア記者による1月18日インタヴュー(抜粋)
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
(記者)大統領選挙期間中に話した時、どの政権の対外政策が優れていると思うかと、私は尋ねました。するとあなたは、ジョージ・H.W.ブッシュの外交政策だと答えました。大統領になった今、その考えに変化はありましたか。

(大統領)ジョージ・H.W.ブッシュの外交政策を評価してきたのは本当だし、非常に困難な時期に非常に上手く対処したと今でも思っています。大統領に就任して3年になりますが、我々の業績を他の人たちの業績と比べることに対しては常に慎重な姿勢が必要だと思いますが、その理由は、時期がそれぞれ違うし、取り組む課題がそれぞれ違っているからです。しかし私が言いたいのは、アメリカの路線を変えようと決意していたし、それによってイラク戦争を終結させ、主敵アルカイダを撲滅することに再度目的を戻し、多角的な論議において我々の同盟とリーダーシップを強化し、米国の国際的リーダーシップを回復することです。そしてこれらの目標は原則的に達成したと考えます。中国、インド、ブラジルなどの新興諸国を認める米国のリーダーシップです。また我々の資源や能力に限界があることを認めるリーダーシップです。そして我々が確立できたと思うのは、重要な国際問題に取り組もうとする時に、今後も米国はかけがえのない国家であり続けると、他の諸国が確信したことです。これからも大きな試練が待ち受けていますし、過去3年で私が学んだことは、どんなに諸処の事柄を上手くリードしたいと思っても、やはり問題は起きるのです。そして対処しなければならず、それらの対処は、たとえ外交や対外政策がどんなに有効であったとしても、どこか不満足な結果を産みだすことがあるのです。しかし全体的な路線は、全体的な戦略は、成功してきました。

(記者)ミット・ロムニーは、あなたが臆病で優柔不断で曖昧だと批判しています。

(大統領)ミット・ロムニーや他の共和党員たちは、予備選挙期間が終わるまで自分たちの陣地で争っているでしょう。予備選挙が終われば、対外政策について真剣な討論を戦わせることになります。そこでは、米国民の前に私の実績を示すことができると自信を持ち、私が就任した時よりも、米国はより安全でより強い、将来性のあるより優位な位置を獲得したと強い自信を感じるでしょう。幾つかの問題では、皆がそれぞれ違った立場からそれぞれ合理性のある主張をするでしょうし、真剣な討論が交わされるでしょう。それらは難しい問題だからです。しかし総じて言えば、私が大統領に就任して以降の3年間で、さらに強固な立場に米国を置く戦略を採用してきたと、十分主張できると私は考えます。

(記者)最大限の圧力をイランにかけても、そして経済的圧力をもってしても、その結果は、オイル価格が高騰し続けるだけで、イランは重要な譲歩を一切しないでしょう。イラン政策は失敗だと言えるでしょうか。

(大統領)これは簡単な問題ではないと思います。そうではないと言う人がいたら、自分が言っていることがわかっていないのです。明らかに、イランは不安定な時期に不安定な地域に存在しています。自国での内部対立は、彼らにとっての重要な戦略的決定を決断するのを非常に困難にしています。それでもやはり、我々の目標は一貫して、圧力と彼らが適切な決断を下す好機とを組み合わせ、圧力を最大限にするために国際社会を動員することでした。イランがより賢明な方向に進むと保障できるでしょうか。できません。だからこそ、イランの核兵器所有を阻止するためなら、どんな選択肢も交渉のテーブルから除外しないと、私は繰り返し言ってきたのです。

(記者)過去3年間のアフガニスタンであなたが採った政策を考える時、対テロ政策に関する部分は、つまりならず者たちを殺害したことは、暴動を鎮圧し、アフガニスタン国内の多くの面を安定化させることよりも数段上手くいったと言えるのでしょうか。

(大統領)言えることは、アルカイダに適用した対テロ戦術は、最高に上手くいったことです。任務は終わっていませんが、アルカイダの力を大きく削いだことは間違いありません。アフガニスタンの安定化に関しては、常にもっと困難で面倒な仕事になるでしょう。なぜならそれは単なる軍事の問題ではなく、経済問題であり、政治問題であり、アフガン政府の能力に関する問題だからです。国家の隅々にまで行き渡る政治に、何世紀も遡る部族や民族間の対立に、アフガン政府は自ら手を付けようとした経験がないのです・・・米国が、3年、4年、5年という時間枠で、アフガニスタン全域に平和と繁栄を基本的にもたらすことができるとは決して思っていません。それができると信じるような人がいたら、アフガニスタンに立ちふさがる歴史や困難を知らない人でしょう。なぜなら、アフガンは世界で第3の最貧国であり、識字率は最低で、世界経済と深く結びついた強い行政府や経済の明確な歴史を持たない国だからです。アフガニスタンがその潜在的力を完全に実現するまでには何十年もかかるでしょう。

(記者)中国人はあなたのごく最近の外交を注視していますが、多くの中国人学者が結論づけているように、米国が中国に対して封じ込め政策をとっていると、中国人が考えるのは当然でしょうか。

(大統領)いいえ、それは正確ではないと思いますし、とりわけそのような定式化は間違っていると思います。我々は、太平洋国家であるし、これからもそうあり続けるという明確なシグナルを送りました。しかしそれはみんな、平和的に発展する中国が誰にとっても幸せなのだという考えを前提にしたことです。アジア地域で原則として我々が主張してきた唯一のことは、誰もが同じルールで行動しなければならないことです。中国だけに特別なルールがあるわけではないのです。それは我々全員に言えることです。

(記者)大統領対外政策チームを、何の対立もなく非常に効果的に取り仕切っていると評価が上がっています。このかなり複雑なプロセスを、議会との関係があまり良くない中で、どうすればそんなにうまく運営できるのですか。

(大統領)私が対外政策チームと仕事をしている時、外部からの雑音はあまりありません。恰好をつけたり、きざな行動をしたりすることもあまりなく、「ケーブルニュースにどう映るか」とか、「ここで点が稼げるだろうか」などといった考えもありません。政府に蔓延していた政治的茶番などは、対外政策チームの中ではそれほど見られません。だからボブ・ゲイツとも効果的な実務的関係や信頼関係を築けたのです。最右派でタカ派だと彼が自称していたのは確かだとしても、そんな古い流儀からは脱皮しています。少なくとも出身は保守派でした。私は一度も彼に、今はどの党に所属しているのか尋ねたことはありません。そんなことは問題ではないからです。ただ彼が素晴らしいアドバイスを私にくれることはわかっていました。

(記者)しかし外国のリーダーたちと同様の関係を構築できましたか。というのも、あなたの外交スタイルに対する批判の中に、冷徹で孤立主義だ、外国の要人との付き合いが悪いというのがありましたから。

(大統領)私は他の政権に関わった経験はありません。だから米国大統領と外国のリーダー達との交流についてはわかりません。しかし私が世界のリーダー達と築いてきた友情や絆があればこそ、我々が有効な外交を展開できた、というのは正しいし、大きな部分を占めていると言えます。アンジェラ・メルケル、シン首相、李大統領、エルドガン首相、デヴィッド・キャメロンなどのリーダーに尋ねてみてください。米国大統領に大きな信用と信頼を置いている、彼の言葉は信用できる、一度口にした約束は最後までやり抜くと、全員が言うでしょう。それが、このような緊密な実務的関係を築くことができ、非常に多くの業績を達成できた一つの理由でもあるのです。

(記者)ジョン・ベイナー(下院議長)と一緒にやれないでしょう。

(大統領)実際のところ、議会の話で言えば、事は個人の関係ではないのです。私がおかしいと思うのは、このような批判の全体が、多くの政府関係のパーティーに私が顔を出さなかったという事実から来ていることです。そして結果として、報道陣はおそらく、私が彼等と交流がないと感じ、彼らと一緒に過ごさなければ、私が冷徹で孤立主義だと断定するのです。実際は、私には13歳と10歳の娘がいて、だから、ミッシェルと私は社交的な場面に顔を出しません。それは、限られた時間の中で本当に忙しいのですが、子ども達にとって重要な時期にいい両親でいたいと思うからです。議会に関しては、我々が現在十分なことができないでいるのは、議会がまったくイデオロギー的態度に終始していて、何事も実行できないことを政治的に利用しているからです。ジョン・ベイナーとの関係は良好です。一緒にゴルフを楽しみました。そんなことは問題ではないのです。どんなに私たちがゴルフを楽しもうと、どんなに笑い合おうと、過去一年を通して多くの問題に責任ある対処をしたと選挙民が彼を支持していなかったことが、彼の抱える問題でした。

(記者)米国の対外政策がその強靭さから究極的にどのように生み出されるかについて、あなたは多くを語ってきました。私がビジネス界の人たちと話すと、超党派赤字委員会のシンプソン・ボウルズ案を受け入れることで米国は財政を正常化するだろうというアピールを、世界や市場に送らなかったと、彼らの多くは失望しています。シンプソン・ボウルズ案に背を向けることで、これは多くの人から聞いた言葉ですが、世界に非常に悪い印象を与えることになりました。なぜあなたはシンプソン・ボウル案を受け入れなかったのですか。

(大統領)最初に言いたいのですが、私はシンプソン・ボウルズ案を歓迎しました。私が委員会を設立したのです。もし私が強引に進めなかったら実現しなかったでしょう。なぜなら、議会の後ろ盾になるはずの人たちは、多くの共和党員も含めてですが、議案に反対しましたから。そう、ほとんどの点であなたは完全に正しい。我々の対外政策全体が、国内経済の強さに基づいていなければなりません。我々が強靭で、安定して、成長し業績を上げ、人材を育成し、そうすることによって世界で最高の技術を持ち、革新性で、基礎研究で、基礎科学で、大学の質で、金融部門の透明性で、世界を牽引し続けることがもしなかったら、そして我々の政治的安定を支え、世界の進むべき道を我々が指し示す上昇志向や機会均等をもし維持しなかったら、その時には同時に、我々の対外政策のリーダーシップも萎えていくでしょう。

inserted by FC2 system