2015年6月TIMEを読む会

The Cancer Gap
Alice Park
March 19, 2015


Stiefel spent Thanksgiving in the hospital being treated for brain cancer. Now she awaits the results of scans that will tell her whether the radiation worked.

No two cancers are alike. But what will it take to give every patient equal care?

Last year, a week before Thanksgiving, Marcia Stiefel was backing out of her driveway in Bismarck, N.D., when her left side went weak. “I noticed I didn’t have peripheral vision,” she says. And after she overshot the drive and hit a fence, twice, she asked her son to drive her to the hospital.

She thought she’d had a stroke, but an MRI revealed something else: a brain tumor called glioblastoma the size of a golf ball. Her doctors wanted to move quickly–her cancer was already Stage IV–so instead of celebrating the holiday cooking for the 10 people she was expecting, including her two sons and their families, Stiefel spent it at the hospital recovering from surgery and preparing for the dual onslaughts of radiation and chemotherapy.

On the list of cancers with the worst prognoses, glioblastoma is near the top. Doctors tend to rank cancers by the likelihood a patient will be alive five years after treatment. That’s the magic mark beyond which people have a better chance of beating a disease altogether. With glioblastoma, within a year or two of diagnosis, 75% of patients are dead.

By some cruel coincidence, Stiefel, 68, knew this already. Her husband died of the same cancer in 2009, after a seizure. His surgery to remove the tumor left him unable to speak or go to the bathroom without her help. “My first thought was that I was going to go like him,” says Stiefel, who lives in an assisted-living facility but manages well without around-the-clock care. “I would cry all the time. I didn’t want to know that I was dying.”

Neither did MaryAnn Anselmo, 59, who spent her Thanksgiving much the same way just a year earlier. A jazz singer who lives with her husband in New Jersey, she learned she had advanced glioblastoma after a dizzy spell sent her to her doctor. She’d already endured six weeks in intensive care after a car accident a year and a half earlier, and the latest diagnosis felt like the final blow. “I thought, Somebody wants me dead here for some reason.”

Both women’s doctors opted first for the blunt-force approach that’s standard for most cancers: surgery, radiation, chemo. But glioblastomas have an insidious habit of infiltrating brain tissue with tiny fingers of malignant cells, making the tumors hard to treat the traditional way. That’s why, even after treatment, they almost inevitably come back.

There’s a better way of attacking glioblastoma, or at least doctors think there is. It’s still at the experimental stage, but when Anselmo’s body couldn’t tolerate the chemo, she eventually became among the first patients to take the risk and test it.

First, Anselmo’s doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City sequenced her tumor’s DNA. If it contained any of the few hundred mutations they know can prompt healthy cells to grow uncontrollably–that’s what cancer does, after all–her doctors could then check her mutations against databases of ongoing clinical trials to see whether she’d be eligible for experimental drugs that might do some good.

The decision to test wasn’t a difficult one for the team at MSKCC; the hospital always has a lot of clinical trials under way, and once they sequenced her tumor, they had reason to believe Anselmo might be a good candidate for a drug being tested in one of them.

Though it’s still early days, the technology and the promise it holds are irresistibly exquisite. But it isn’t available everywhere, and that’s where Anselmo’s care diverges from Stiefel’s. At Sanford Health in Bismarck, if oncology director Dr. Thandiwe Gray profiles a tumor and finds a mutation, there’s very little chance she will be able to refer her patient to a trial, regardless of how promising the medication seems. Her hospital simply isn’t running as many clinical trials, which require a steady flow of patients with a variety of different cancers to fill the testing slots. And what if the testing spits out mutations for which doctors don’t have any drugs, even unproven ones they want to try? What then?

For now, these two women with the same diagnosis are case studies of where cancer care is today and what it will take to bring it to a point, in the not-too-distant future, where doctors say it needs to be.

The Promise of Precision
The way cancer has been treated for the past several decades has been the standard of care for a reason: it’s been studied–a lot. But the calculus that favors the tried and true over the intriguing but experimental is being undermined by a radical reconception of what cancer is and what propels the malignancies that resist treatment and take so many lives.

No two cancers are alike; even within an individual patient, tumors may change over time. And doctors are learning that a melanoma growth might have more in common with a lung cancer or a brain cancer than another melanoma. “We are moving away from the concept that all lung cancers are the same and all breast cancers are the same and all colon cancers are the same,” says Dr. David Solit, director of the Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology at MSKCC. “Now we are going to know if you have EGFR mutant lung cancer or an ALK fusion lung cancer or a BRAF mutant brain cancer. And we are going to know better ways to treat those cancers based on those mutations.”

That’s led to a new consensus that to truly fight cancer, doctors need to understand it from the inside out, which means decoding its DNA and exposing the ways it co-opts the body’s healthy cells. Once that’s known, the task becomes to develop drugs that can thwart the way a given cancer wrecks the body. Until recently, this highly sophisticated approach to cancer was virtually nonexistent. But fast-moving developments in genetics and molecular biology are quickly changing that. “This type of testing isn’t standard of care yet, but everyone agrees it will be at some point,” says Solit.

This has come to be known as the precision revolution in medicine, the push to move away from crowd-based, best-for-most treatments like the kind Stiefel is getting, and toward therapies designed to treat an individual patient’s ills, as with Anselmo’s care. The mantra for the precision approach is to learn from every single patient.

In January 2015, the federal government launched a $215 million Precision Medicine Initiative to help build a database of health information about 1 million Americans and to support research at the National Cancer Institute. That funding alone, however, isn’t nearly enough to usher in the new era of custom cancer care. For this idea to succeed, every personalized therapy a doctor tries must be pooled to build a massive research tool that all physicians can share. That’s the goal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which recently announced it is creating a registry of patients who take drugs that are approved for a cancer other than the one for which they were cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “We want to gather that information and see what happens to those patients, even if they aren’t in a clinical trial,” says Dr. Julie Vose, chief of hematology and oncology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and president-elect of ASCO.

She knows that such treatments, as with anything bespoke, will take lots of good data, as well as time, labor and money–which for now aren’t distributed equally among hospitals in the U.S.

Currently, less than 5% of the 1.6 million people diagnosed with cancer each year in the U.S. can take advantage of genetic testing, which can run anywhere from $3,000 to $8,000, depending on how many genes are analyzed. At most hospitals, this kind of testing is limited. And even at centers like MSKCC, about 70% of patients’ genetic testing is not covered by insurance, so the program operates at a loss. For its part, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston funds its testing almost entirely with donations. “It’s clearly not a long-term sustainable model,” says Dr. Funda Meric-Bernstam, medical director of the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy there.

There’s also the reality that too much information–and a dearth of sophisticated drugs–could lead to gambles. Doctors now know of a few hundred mutations linked to cancer, but there are targeted therapies for only about 20 to 40 of them. “If an early-stage cancer is curable with standard care, identifying a mutation just adds anxiety to the patient and might provoke the doctor to do something stupid,” says Meric-Bernstam.

Who will guide doctors to make smart decisions? How will they decide when to test and when not to test? Regulatory agencies like the FDA, which greenlights drugs for human use, will also have to play serious catch-up and review the drug-approval process. “Doctors and patients are way ahead of where the FDA and insurance companies are in using different medications,” says Vose. And with lives in the balance, those doctors aren’t likely to slow down anytime soon.

Not Yet an Even Playing Field
“Forever and ever is what they tell me,” says Stiefel about how long she has to take the four chemo pills she swallows five days a week each month. She started her chemo regimen at the same time her six weeks of radiation began.

The combination is a brutal one-two punch, and it’s supposed to be–to knock out as many of the lingering cancer cells as possible. It robbed Stiefel of her hair and sapped her energy; she still sleeps a lot, and for a while, the only thing that would wake her was the bouts of nausea that would hit at all hours.

Her usual optimism also took a hit. “I didn’t want to be out of control, but you definitely are out of control because the prognosis is just so devastating,” she says. For help, she turned to a therapist, who taught her positive-thinking techniques and prescribed antianxiety and antidepressant medications. Now beginning her second round of chemo with a higher dose, she says, “You have to put some faith in what the doctors say. You only hope they know what’s best for you.”

Her doctors meet weekly to discuss every cancer case at the hospital. When they suspect the presence of mutations for which there are FDA-approved drugs–and there are only a few dozen–they send out samples to get the tumor sequenced by an outside institution. But if there are no drugs available, which is more often the situation, says Dr. Tarek Dufan, medical director at the Bismarck Cancer Center, the decision is not to test.

Even if Stiefel’s tumor were to be profiled, for example, it wouldn’t necessarily mean she’d follow the same path as Anselmo’s. Stiefel’s tumor could fall into the majority of mutations that doctors can identify but for which there are no approved drugs.

Tumor profiling can also bring about impasses. The last time Bismarck’s oncology director, Gray, had to weigh such profiling with a glioblastoma, she decided to go ahead with it. But instead of introducing promise, the results did the opposite. The patient’s tumor had a mutation that nearly guaranteed it wouldn’t respond to the only chemo available for his disease.

“How do I treat this patient with something that is not going to be great according to genomics? How do I tell this patient it’s the only thing I have?” she says. “I figured, You know what, maybe I’m better off right now, when I don’t have a lot of agents to offer my patients, not to do genomic testing.”

The march of innovation in cancer treatment is forcing doctors around the country to make such Solomonic decisions nearly every day. “Right now, genetic profiling is giving us interesting information on some patients, but we are at a point where we don’t know what to totally make of that information yet,” says Vose, the ASCO president-elect.

Gray ended up giving that patient the chemo, and defying the odds, he lived another two years. If the genomic testing had been absolutely correct, he likely wouldn’t have survived so long. So was the test wrong? Did the chemo work? Did the patient just get lucky? Those are questions Gray–and science–can’t yet answer.

The Cutting Edge
When Anselmo was referred to Dr. David Hyman, acting director of developmental therapeutics at MSKCC, it was because she was out of options. Her surgeon had removed 75% of her tumor, but the rest was too enmeshed in her brain to scrape away safely. On Christmas Day, she took her first chemo pill, and the next day she began six weeks of radiation.

But within weeks, her immune system started to crash, and after she’d been on the drug about a month, her doctors took her off it. Her only other option, Avastin, is the second-line therapy for a reason; most tumors start growing again after just four months.

Because glioblastoma is so hard to treat, Hyman had already ordered a genetic test of her tumor after surgery. And on the basis of the results, he thought she should join a trial he was running.

His study, which is called a basket trial, pulls together people with 20 different types of cancers–including brain tumors like Anselmo’s, lung cancers and colon cancers–whose tumors all share the same genetic mutation. MSKCC’s genetic test scans for known aberrations in 410 genes that have been linked to cancer. In Anselmo’s case, her doctors learned that her brain cancer is driven by a mutation called BRAF. While common in melanoma, the mutation is rarer in glioblastoma. Basket trials are an efficient way of seeing whether different cancers with the same mutation respond in the same way to a drug that’s designed to hijack it. And that’s what MSKCC is testing on Anselmo and others with a drug called vemurafenib, which was approved in 2011 for melanoma.

Of course, there are no guarantees. Even if they share the same mutation, cancers that start in the skin, where cells divide and die more rapidly than almost anywhere else in the body, are almost certainly a little different from cells in the brain, which are more protected and conserved. The side effects of such drugs are largely unknown. It’s also a complete mystery how many of the people in the basket will be alive a year, two years, and five years after taking the drug.

When Hyman first met Anselmo he really wanted to offer her something. Weak from the radiation and what little chemotherapy she could tolerate, she was in a “bad situation.” Without the chemo, he knew, any remaining cancer cells would inevitably start to grow again, some venturing beyond the brain to other parts of her body.

“It’s an awful disease to watch a patient suffer from,” Hyman says. “They become weak, and that changes their personality. It saps them of what makes them them.”

Hyman knew how effective vemurafenib is on BRAF melanomas, so he had good reason to hope for–and expect–similar results with Anselmo’s brain tumor.

He turned out to be right. She has been swallowing the drug daily for almost a year–longer than her doctors thought she would survive, with or without chemo. Other than a brief rash from treatment, Anselmo hasn’t experienced any side effects. (Like Stiefel, she lost most of her hair during radiation, which tends to burn the scalp.) “Every time I go back to have a new MRI taken, they find no growth,” she says. So far, the tumor has shrunk an additional 55%.

“It’s almost unprecedented to have this type of regression with the currently approved therapy,” says Hyman.

As promising as her results are so far, Anselmo didn’t know what would happen when she signed up for the trial. Still, choosing to try an experimental drug she was eligible for hardly felt like a choice. But it was still more of a choice than many people with glioblastomas get to make.

Trial and Error
For now, many factors that have nothing to do with science determine which trial drugs a patient has access to. There’s geography, since most Americans are treated at the hospital closest to home, and most hospitals don’t have a lot of clinical trials under way at any given time. There’s also money: both a patient’s financial situation and that of their cancer center can influence what’s available to them.

Finally, there’s human temperament–the squeaky-wheel factor, which can at times put patients at odds with science. Doctors know that vemurafenib works on tumors with BRAF mutations, for instance, but simply hearing about the trial at MSKCC may be enough to prompt patients who have not had genetic testing to beg, plead and bargain for access to the drug–and for doctors who might not have anything else to offer them to prescribe it.

Stiefel’s doctors anticipate it may come to that, though Gray says she would profile the tumor first. “But I don’t want to waste too much time in waiting to test,” she says. Stiefel still hasn’t had her first scan to see how her tumor has responded to the radiation and chemo.

Unlike Anselmo’s immune system, Stiefel’s held up to the regimen. But if her glioblastoma proves true to form, it will eventually evade the chemo that Stiefel’s doctors say she’ll have to take for the rest of her life. But if there are any signs that her cancer is growing again or that it has spread, Gray will try to find out which mutations Stiefel’s tumor has. If it contains the BRAF mutation, Gray plans to prescribe the drug even though it’s still not approved for glioblastoma. “I will do what I think is best for my patient,” she says.

That’s possible because doctors have a lot of leeway in the way they prescribe drugs. Any drug approved by the FDA can be prescribed for any purpose, as long as the doctor has reason to. Covering the cost of the drug is another matter. Insurers use FDA approval as a criterion for deciding which drugs to reimburse. So when it comes to off-label prescribing, there’s no guarantee that insurance will cover the cost, which in the case of vemurafenib is exorbitant–up to $65,000 for the recommended six-month treatment period. If Gray and Stiefel move forward with that plan, it becomes a matter of “a lot of begging of the insurance company,” Gray says, to pay for the drug.

Her efforts, as well as Hyman’s and those of thousands of other cancer doctors across the country, share the same goal: to give their patients more than what they have today–to offer them tailored and scientifically tested therapies that have a strong chance of conquering their disease.

There’s a reason we fear tumors that arise seemingly out of nowhere and there’s a reason we catch our breath when we hear the diagnosis. By its nature, cancer is unpredictable and untamable. But calming the rampant growth one patient and one mutation at a time may provide the best chance yet of finally getting cancer under control.

That’s what Stiefel is counting on. “People have told me miracles happen, that they know someone who had this and lived for an extra 15 years,” she says. “I just have to stay positive. That’s your only salvation.”

CLOSING THE CANCER GAP
≪癌のギャップを埋める≫
<この2人の女性は脳腫瘍を患っている。1人は病を克服しつつある>

1つとして同じ癌はない。どの患者にも公平な治療をおこなうためには何が必要なのだろうか。

去年の感謝祭の1週間前、マーシァ・スティフェルはノースダコタ州ビズマーク市にある自宅の私道で車をバックさせている時、身体の左半分に痺れを感じた。「視野が狭くなった気がしました」と言う。そして2度、車道を行き過ぎてフェンスに突っ込んだ時、息子に頼んで病院に連れて行ってもらった。

発作を起こしたと思ったが、MRIの結果は他の原因で、グリア芽腫というゴルフボール大の脳腫瘍だった。医者は緊急処置が必要だと考え――すでにステージⅣまで進行していた――2人の息子とその家族などと過ごすために計画していた10人分の感謝祭の料理をやめて、外科手術後の回復と、放射線と抗がん剤の併用療法に備えて病院で過ごした。

癌の最悪の予後を示すリストで、グリア芽腫はほとんどトップに上げられている。医者は、治療後5年生存する可能性によって癌の悪性ランク付けをするようだ。その線を越えると、癌が完治したといえるマジック・マークだ。グリア芽腫の場合、診断後1年~2年以内の死亡率は75%だ。

残酷な偶然で、スティフェル(68歳)はすでにこのことを知っていた。2009年、夫が発作を起こした後、同じ癌で亡くなっていた。腫瘍摘出の手術によって言葉を失い、彼女の介助なしにはトイレにも行けなくなった。「最初に考えたことは、私も夫と同じようになる、ということでした」介護施設に住み、24時間介護を必要とせず自力で暮らしている。「ずっと泣いていました。もうすぐ死ぬなんて、知りたくありませんでした」

マリアン・アンセルモ(59歳)も、感謝祭を昨年と同じように過ごしていたが、スティフェルと同じ思いだった。夫とニュージャージー州に住むジャズ・シンガーのマリアンは、発作的な眩暈を起こして医者にかかった後、進行したグリア芽腫だと告げられた。1年半前に自動車事故を起こし、6週間の集中治療に耐えたところだったので、癌の告知はとどめの一撃を受けたように感じた。「きっと何か理由があって、誰かが私にここで死ねと言っているように思いました」

2人の女性の担当医は、ほとんどの癌患者が受ける標準的治療、腫瘍を叩く鈍的療法を選択した。外科手術、放射線療法、化学療法だ。しかしグリア芽腫は癌細胞の小さな棘が脳組織に密かに侵入し、従来の療法では治療できない特徴をもつ。だから治療をしても、ほとんどの場合に再発する。

グリア芽腫を治療するもっと良い方法がある・・・と少なくとも医者はそう考えている。まだ実験段階ではあるが、アンセルモの体力が抗がん剤に耐えられなくなった時、危険を承知で最初の治験患者群に加わった。

ニューヨーク市メモリアル・スローン=ケタリング・癌センター(MSKCC)の医者は、まずアンセルモの腫瘍のDNA配列を解析した。もし彼女のDNAの中に、正常な細胞を治療不可能な癌細胞へと急速に変えるという数百個の変異が1つでも含まれていれば――要するに、それが癌なのだが――彼女の変異細胞を現在進行中の治験データベースと突合させて、少しでも効果があると思われる治験薬の治験患者に加わる資格があるかどうかを調べる。

治験の決定はMSKCC医療チームにとって難しいものではなかった。病院は常に多くの医療治験をおこなっているし、アンセルモの腫瘍のシークエンスをおこなった時、治験の1つにアンセルモが参加するだけの十分な根拠があると医者は考えた。

まだ実験初期段階ではあるが、この治験薬がもつ技術と可能性は抗しがたいほど素晴らしいものだ。しかしこの治療はどこでもできるものではなく、それがアンセルモの治療とスティフェルの治療との違いだ。ビズマーク市のサンフォード・ヘルスで、もし腫瘍学ディレクターのタンディウィ・グレイ博士が腫瘍を種別し、変異を見つけた場合は、いかにその治療が有望であろうと、彼女が自分の患者を治験に参加させるという可能性はほとんどない。博士の病院は単に多くの医療治験をおこなっているだけではなく、様々な種類の癌をもちながら治験期間満了まで生存する患者が、絶えずたくさん入院してくることが必要なのだ。そしてもし検査結果が、治療薬がない、医者が実験したいと思う未証明の薬さえない変異を示した場合にはどうなるのか。その時はどうなるのか。

同じ診断を下されたこの2人の女性は、さしあたり癌治療の現段階の、そして医者が遠くない将来にあるはずだと考える一定の地点まで到達するための症例研究だ。

<精密照射治療の有望性>
過去数十年の癌療法が標準化されたものであったのには、それなりの根拠があった。多くの療法が研究されてきた。しかし癌の正体が何であり、治療が困難で、患者の命を奪う悪性腫瘍へと進行させるものが何なのかについて、根底的に研究することによって、興味深いとはいえ未だ実験段階にある治療よりも、すでに実証済みの治療を選ぼうとする姿勢が根本から崩されつつある。

1つとして同じ癌はない。同じ患者の体内に発症する癌であっても、時とともに変化していくことがある。そして、肺癌や脳腫瘍患者に発症する黒色腫の進行が、一般的に他の黒色腫よりも早いことを医者は発見しつつある。「肺癌はみな同じ、乳癌はみな同じ、大腸癌はみな同じ、そんな考え方を否定しつつあります」とMSKCCの分子腫瘍学クレビス・センター長のデビッド・ソリット博士は言う。「現在、EGFR(上皮成長受容体)癌や、ALK(未分化リンパ腫キナーゼ)溶解肺癌や、BRAF(細胞蛋白変異型黒色腫)変異脳腫瘍を発症しているかどうかを、診断できるようになりつつあります。そしてそれぞれの変異に基づいて、癌のより効果的な治療法を解明しつつあります」

そこで次のような合意が形成される。本当に癌と闘うためには、医者は癌のすべてを完全に理解する必要があり、そのためには癌のDNAを解析し、体内の健康な細胞を侵食していく過程を明らかにする必要がある。それが解明できた時には、癌が体を蝕む過程を阻む薬を開発することが任務となる。最近まで、このような非常に進んだ癌に対するアプローチはないに等しかった。しかし遺伝学や分子学の急速な進展によって、現実はめまぐるしく変わっている。「この種の検査はまだ標準的な治療ではありませんが、やがてはそうなると誰もが思っています」とソリットは言う。

医学界ではこれを精度革命と呼んでいて、スティフェルが現在受けているような大勢に適合する治療である標準的治療ではなく、アンセルモの治療のように個別の患者に合わせて組み立てられた治療に向っている。精密治療のスローガンは「一人一人の患者から学べ」だ。

2015年1月、連邦政府は100万人の米国市民に関する健康情報のデータベースの確立を援助し、国立癌協会の研究を支援するために、2億1500万ドルかけて精密医療協会設立に乗り出した。しかし組織の設立だけでは、オーダー・メイド治療の新時代を牽引するのに十分ではない。この計画を成功させるためには、医者が試みている一人一人に則した治療が、すべての医者が共有できる巨大な研究手段を構築するために蓄積されなければならない。それが米国臨床腫瘍学会(ASCO)の目標であり、食糧医薬品局(FDA)が薬を認可した使用目的以外の癌の治療に適用を許可された患者を登録している、と最近ASCOは発表した。「たとえ彼らが治験患者でなくとも、その情報を集め、これらの患者がどうなっているかを観察したいのです」とネブラスカ大学医療センター長の血液・腫瘍学の学長でありASCO次期会長であるジュリー・ボーズ博士は言う。

このような治療は周知のように、多くの優れたデータ、同様に時間、労力、資金を必要とすることを博士は承知している――これらは国内のすべての病院に公平にいきわたっているとはいえない。

現在、米国内では毎年1600万人が癌と診断され、その内の5%以下の患者が運よく遺伝子検査を受けることができるが、その検査は分析する遺伝子の数によって3000ドルから8000ドルの費用を必要とする。ほとんどの病院は、この種の検査をするには限界がある。そしてMSKCCのようなセンターでさえ、遺伝子検査の70%が保険適用されないので、研究は赤字で運営されている。赤字を埋めるために、ヒューストンのテキサス大学医学部アンダーソン・癌センターでは、検査費用のほとんどを寄付に頼っている。「明らかに長期的に維持できる研究体制ではありません」と同センター個別化癌治療研究所のメディカル・ディレクター、フンダ・メリック・バーンスタム博士は言う。

同時に、あまりに多くの情報が溢れているために――そして先端的治療薬が不足しているために――ギャンブルのような治療が必然化するだろう。今では、医者は癌に結びつく変異が数百あることを知っているが、癌細胞を直接攻撃する治療があるのは、その中の20から40に過ぎない。「もしも初期段階の癌が従来の治療で治るのなら、変異を特定する検査は、患者に無用な希望を抱かせ、医者を愚行に走らせることになるかも知れません」とメリック・バーンスタムは言う。

誰が医者に賢明な決断をするための指導をするのだろうか。どんな時には検査すべきで、どんな時には検査をすべきでないかを、どう決断すればいいのか。FDAのような規制担当局が薬の人間への使用を許可するのだが、現場の現実を早急に把握し、認可過程を見直さなければならない。「医者や患者は、新しい医療を行うという点では、FDAや保険会社よりも一歩先を行っています」とボーズは言う。そして生死がかかった現場では、今のところ患者を前にした医者たちが減速する気配はなさそうだ。

<研究機関の平均化の必要性>
「この先ずっとです、と医者に言われました」毎月週に5日4錠の抗がん剤をいつまで服用するのかについてスティフェルは言う。化学療法と同時に週6回の放射線治療を始めた。

併用治療は手酷いダブルパンチで、この治療は体内に残存する癌細胞をできる限りやっつけるためだという。治療によって、スティフェルの髪の毛は抜け、体力はなくなった。今でもほとんど寝ていることが多く、常に襲ってくる吐き気があるから起きるだけだ。

スティフェルの普段の陽気さも消えてしまった。「取り乱したくはありませんでしたが、癌宣告は痛烈です」と言う。セラピストにも頼り、前向きに考える方法を教わり、抗不安剤や抗鬱剤を処方してもらった。現在、抗がん剤の量を増量した第二クルーに入ったスティフェルは言う。「医者が言うことを信じるしかありません、患者に一番いいことを医者は知っていること願っています」

スティフェルの治療班は毎週会議をもち、病院の一人一人の癌患者の病状について話し合う。FDA認可薬(数十しかないのだが)が使える変異細胞の可能性が確認されたら、腫瘍のDNA配列検査のためにサンプルを外注検査に出す。しかし使える薬がなければ、その可能性が大きいとビスマーク・癌センター医長タレック・ドゥファン博士は言うのだが、検査はしないという決定が下される。

例えば、スティフェルの腫瘍が解析されたとしても、アンセルモが受けた治療と同じ治療を受けられたとは限らないだろう。スティフェルの腫瘍が、医師たちが特定できる変異細胞の大部分に該当したとしても、使える認可薬がないのだ。

腫瘍の確定は同時に治療の行き詰まりを意味するかもしれない。ビスマークの腫瘍学部長グレイがグリア芽腫の特定を検討した最近の症例では、彼女はやってみよう決断した。しかし結果は悪く、裏目に出た。患者の腫瘍には、その種の癌に使える唯一の抗がん剤も効果がないことが明らかな変異細胞があった。

「ゲノミクスに従えば効き目がないとされる薬を、何で自分の患者に使えるでしょう。そして他には方法がないと、どうして患者に言えるでしょう」とグレイ博士は言う。「私がどう考えたか・・・わかりますか。患者に提供できる抗がん剤がそれほどない時には、ゲノム検査なんてしない方がずっといいと思ったのです」

癌治療の進歩は、全米の医者にソロモンの決断のような難問をほぼ毎日のようにつきつける。「さしあたり遺伝子解析は、ある一定の患者についての興味深い情報を医者に与えてくれますが、その情報を全体としてどう利用すればいいのか、未だにわからない次元にいるのです」と次期ASCO所長ボーズは言う。

結局グレイはその患者に抗がん剤を使うことにしたが、予想に反して患者はさらに2年生存した。もしゲノム検査が完全に正しかったら、それほど長く患者は生きられなかっただろう。では検査は間違っていたのか。それとも運が良かっただけなのか。グレイにとって――そして科学にとっても――それに対する答えはまだ見つかっていない。

<最先端医療>
アンセロマがMSKCCの開発治療学部の副所長デヴィッド・ハイマンに紹介されたのは、他に選択肢がなかったからだ。担当の外科医はアンセロマの腫瘍の75%を切除したが、残りは脳に癒着していて切除するには危険だった。クリスマスの日、最初の抗がん剤を飲み、翌日6日間の放射線治療を開始した。

しかし数週間のうちに免疫力が急激に低下し、約1ヵ月服用した後、医者は中止した。唯一残された治療はアバスティン剤で、ほとんどの腫瘍は4ヵ月経つと再び成長し始めるため、そのための二番手の治療として考えられていたものだ。

グリア芽腫は治療が非常に難しいので、ハイマンは切除手術の後、すでにアンセロマの遺伝子検査を入れていた。その結果によっては、現在自分が進めている治験に彼女を参加させようと考えていた

ハイマンの研究はバスケット治験と呼ばれ、肺癌、大腸癌、アルセルモのような脳腫瘍など20種類の癌を発症し、その腫瘍は同じ遺伝子変異を持つ患者を寄せ集める。MSKCCの遺伝子検査は、癌に結びつく410の遺伝子の中に発見済みの異状があるかどうかをスキャンする。アンセルモの症例では、BRAF変異細胞によって脳腫瘍が形成されたことがわかった。黒色腫には一般的だが、この変異はグリア芽腫には珍しい。バスケット治験は、同じ変異細胞をもつ異なった癌が、癌を消滅させるために設計された薬に対して同じように反応するかどうかを調べるのに効果的な手段だ。そしてこれこそが、MSKCCがアンセルモや他の患者をベムラフェニブ剤で試験しているものなのだ。この治験剤は、2011年に黒色腫のために認可されている。

もちろん確証はない。たとえ同じ変異細胞を持っていても、身体のどの部分よりも急速に細胞分裂し破棄される皮膚組織に発生した癌細胞は、脳細胞とは少し異なっているのはほぼ確実だ。脳細胞は皮膚細胞よりも保護されているし長持ちする。これらの薬の副作用はほとんど知られていない。またバスケット群に集められた患者の多くが、試験薬を服用した後、1年、2年、あるいは5年生存するかどうかもまったくわからない。

ハイマン博士がアンセルモを初めて診断した時、何とかしたいと心から思った。放射線に弱く、微量の抗がん剤にも耐えられず、アンセルモは「どん詰まり状態」だった。抗がん剤を使わなければ、残存する癌細胞は再び成長し始め、脳以外の部位に転移するのは間違いなかった。

「癌は見るに忍びないほど患者を苦しめる残酷な病気です」ハイマンは言う。「体は衰弱し、人格まで変えてしまいます。その人らしさをすっかり奪い取ってしまうのです」

ベムラフェニブがBRAF黒色腫に効果的だとハイマンは知っていたので、当然にもアンセルモの脳腫瘍にも効くと望みをかけ、期待もした。

正解だった。ほぼ1年間、アルセルモは毎日ベムラフェニブを服用し続け、時には抗がん剤を投与しながらも、医者が予想した以上に長く生存している。軽い発疹が出た以外は副作用はなかった(頭部への照射が多い放射線治療で、スティフェルのように髪の毛はほとんど抜けてしまった)。「MRIを撮りに行くたびに、腫瘍が大きくなっていないとわかります」とアルセルモは言う。いまのところ腫瘍はさらに55%小さくなっている。

「現在承認されている療法で、これほどの改善を見るのはほとんど前例がありません」とハイマンは言う。

これまでの経過を見れば期待できるものだが、アンセルモが治験を承諾した時点では何が起きるかわからなかった。それでも、アルセルモが参加できる治験薬をやってみると決めた時には、それ以外に選択の余地がほとんどないと思った。しかしグリア芽腫患者の多くに残されている選択肢のことを思えば、ずっと恵まれた選択だった。

<思考錯誤>
現在、多くの非科学的な要因が、どの治験薬を患者が受けるかを決定している。ほとんどの市民が近くの病院で治療を受けるという地理的要因があり、ほとんどの病院は常に治験を行っているわけではない。資金の要因もある。患者の経済状態や、患者がかかる癌センターの財政状態も患者が受けられる治療に影響する。

最後に、人間の感情的な要素が加わる。新薬を求める声の大きさが物をいい、時には科学的判断など関係なく、患者に軍配が上がる。たとえば、医者はベムラフェニブがBRAF変異細胞癌に効果があることを知っているとしても、患者がMSKCCの治験を耳にしただけで、遺伝子検査もしていないのに何とか新薬を手に入れようと懇願してくる。そして他に治療法がない医者はその薬を処方することになる。

スティフェルの医師団はベムラフェニブを使いたいと考えたが、グレイはまず腫瘍の解析が先だと言う。「でも検査を待って、あまり時間を無駄にしたくはありません」とも言う。放射線治療や抗がん剤が腫瘍に効くかどうかを調べるスキャンを、スティフェルはまだ一度も受けていない。

アンセルモの免疫システムとは違って、スティフェルの免疫システムは治療に耐えている。しかし彼女のグリア芽腫がベムラフェニブに適合するタイプだと判明すれば、医者が一生受け続けなければならないという抗がん剤は避けられるだろう。しかしもしグリア芽腫が進行していたり、転移している兆候があれば、スティフェルの腫瘍がどんな変異細胞をもっているかを調べるだろう。もしBRAF変異細胞が見つかれば、たとえグリア芽腫治療薬として認可されていない薬であっても、グレイはベムラフェニブ剤をスティフェルに処方するだろう。「自分の患者に最良だと思う治療をします」と言う。

医者は薬を処方する際にかなりの自由裁量があるのだから、それも可能だ。FDAが認可した薬は、正当な理由がありさえすればどんな症状にも医者は処方することができる。しかしそれに保険が使えるかどうかは別問題だ。FDAが認可した病気に対する処方を基準に、保険会社は保険適用を決定する。FDA認可基準以外に薬を処方すれば、保険適用は保障できない。ベムラフェニブの場合は非常に高価なことから、6ヵ月の推奨服用期間の価格は最高65,000ドルになる。もしグレイとスティフェルがこの治療計画に踏み切るとしたら、「どうしても保険会社の力を借りるしかない」とグレイは言う。

ハイマンのように全国で努力する何千という癌専門医と同様に、グレイ博士も同じ目的のために努力している。現在可能とされる以上の治療を患者に処方するために――癌に打ち勝つことができるオーダー・メイドの、しかも医学的に証明された治療法を患者に提供するために。

突然に闇雲に襲ってくる腫瘍は恐ろしいし、告知された時には息が止まる思いをするのも当然だ。癌の特徴は、予測できないし治療が困難なことだ。しかしところ構わず転移しようとする癌を、一人の患者の一つの変異細胞に的を絞って抑えることによって、最終的に癌をコントロールできるかもしれない。

それが、スティフェルが頼っていることだ。「きっと奇蹟が起きる、グリア芽腫を発症して、予測よりも15年長く生存した人を知っている、と言われました」とスティフェルは言う。「前向きに生きることです。そうすることが唯一自分を救うことになるのです」

America’s Broken Ladder

Rana Foroohar
May 7, 2015

Why racial and economic fairness can no longer be treated as separate issues


One thing is clear after the tragic death of Freddie Gray, the young African-American man who was fatally injured while in police custody in Baltimore last month: we cannot fix the problems of economic justice in this country without addressing racial justice. The deck is stacked against low-income Americans–African Americans and Latinos in particular. As a newly released report from a pair of Harvard academics has found, just being born in a poor part of Baltimore–or Atlanta, Chicago, L.A., New York City or any number of other urban areas–virtually ensures that you’ll never make it up the socioeconomic ladder. Boys from low-income households who grow up in the kind of beleaguered, mostly minority neighborhoods like the one Gray was from will earn roughly 25% less than peers who moved to better neighborhoods as children. So much for the American Dream.

This has big implications. Income inequality is shaping up to be the key economic issue of the 2016 campaign. If you have any doubt, consider that both Hillary Clinton and Marco Rubio, who declared their candidacies in the past few weeks, are already staking out positions. Clinton billed herself as the candidate for the “everyday American,” calling for higher wages and criticizing bloated CEO salaries. Meanwhile, Rubio said he wants the Republican Party–which, he said, is portrayed unfairly as “a party that doesn’t care about people who are trying to make it”–to remake itself into “the champion of the working class.”

What neither candidate has done yet is directly connect the recent spate of violence to the fact that the economic ladder no longer works for a growing number of Americans. Raising the federal minimum wage is just a first step. As Thomas Piketty showed in his best-selling book on inequality, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, creating a system of capitalism that more equitably distributes wealth is our biggest challenge now. A few extra dollars an hour will help minimum-wage workers (a group in which minorities are overrepresented), but it won’t address deeper economic inequality. And as a growing body of research from outfits like the Brookings Institution has shown, more inequality means less opportunity. As Brookings senior fellow Isabel Sawhill puts it, “When the rungs on the ladder are farther apart, it’s harder to climb up them.”

The dirty secret of America in 2015 is that the wealth gap between whites and everyone else is far worse than most people would guess. A 2014 study by Duke University and the Center for Global Policy Solutions, a Washington-based consultancy, found that the median amount of liquid wealth (assets that can easily be turned into cash) held by African-American households was $200. For Latino households it was $340. The median for white households: $23,000. One reason for the difference is that a disproportionate number of nonwhites, along with women and younger workers of all races, have little or no access to formal retirement-savings plans. Another is that they were hit harder in the mortgage crisis, in part because housing is where the majority of Americans, especially nonwhites, keep most of their wealth. In this sense, the government’s policy decision to favor lenders over homeowners in the 2008 bailouts favored whites over people of color.

That’s bad news for a country that will be “majority minority” by 2043, according to Maya Rockeymoore, president of the Center for Global Policy Solutions. The U.S. economy continues to be stuck in a slow, volatile recovery. Lack of consumer demand driven by stagnant or falling wages, and decreased opportunity for many Americans, is what many economists believe is behind the paltry growth. Given that 70% of the U.S. economy is driven by consumer demand, it’s a problem that will eventually affect everyone’s bottom line, rich and poor.

How to fix it? We need to think harder about narrowing the gap between those at the bottom and the top. If most people, especially lower-income individuals and minorities, keep the bulk of their wealth in housing, we should rethink lending practices and allow for a broader range of credit metrics (which tend to be biased toward whites) and lower down payments for good borrowers. Rethinking our retirement policies is crucial too. Retirement incentives work mainly for whites and the rich. Minority and poor households are less likely to have access to workplace retirement plans, in part because many work in less formal sectors like restaurants and child care. Another overdue fix: we should expand Social Security by lifting the cap on payroll taxes so the rich can contribute the same share of their income as everyone else.

Doing both would be a good first step. But going forward, economic and racial fairness can no longer be thought of as separate issues.

American's Broken Ladder
≪米国の壊れた梯子≫
<人種と経済的平等はなぜ切り離せないないのか>

アフリカ系米国市民フレディ・グレイ青年の悲劇的な死ではっきりしたことが一つある。先月、フレディはバルティモアで警官に身柄を拘束されている間に、乱暴されて死亡した。この国では、人種的不平等に手を付けることなしには、経済的不平等を解決できない。低所得者層はどうしようもなくなっている――特に、アフリカ系とラテン系市民だ。最近公表されたハーバード・アカデミーの報告では、バルティモアの貧困地区に生まれただけで――アトランタ、シカゴ、ロサンジェルス、ニューヨークなど何処の都市部でも同じだが――出世は諦めなければならない現実がある。そのほとんどはグレイが育ったようなマイノリティが住む地域だが、そんな環境にある低所得家庭の少年は、子ども時代によりましな地域に引っ越した少年と比べて、およそ25%所得が将来的に少なくなる。アメリカン・ドリームもこれまでだ。

これは重大な意味を持っている。所得の不平等は、2016年選挙戦の焦点になりそうだ。疑うなら、つい数週間前に立候補声明を出したヒラリー・クリントンとマルコ・ルビオがこの点ついて早々と立場を明らかにしていることを見てほしい。クリントンは「普通の人たち」のために立候補すると売り込み、賃金引き上げやCEOの高額給与を批判している。一方でルビオは、不当にも「共和党は、苦労している人たちの味方ではない」という印象を持たれているので、「労働者の味方」へと変わってほしい、と言っている。

どちらの候補者も、最近起きた一連の暴力事件が、経済的な上り梯子が何の意味も持たない市民がますます増えていっている事実とを関係づけることをまだしていない。全国最低賃金を引き上げることは最初の一歩に過ぎない。トーマス・ピケティが不平等を論じたベストセラー「21世紀の資本」で述べているように、富をより平等に分配する資本主義制度を創りだすことは、現代の最大のチャレンジである。1時間に数ドルの賃上げは最賃労働者にとって少しの助けにはなるだろうが(マイノリティがこの階層に集中している)、より深刻な経済的不平等を解決することにはならない。ブルッキングズ研究所のようなグループが相次いで研究報告を出しているように、不平等が大きくなることはチャンスがないことである。ブルッキングズ研究所の上級研究員イザベル・ソーヒルが指摘しているように「梯子段の間がますます広がって、とても昇ってはいけない」。

2015年の表に出したくない醜悪な事実とは、白人とそれ以外の市民との貧富の差が、皆が考えるよりも今までになく大きくなっていることだ。デューク大学とワシントンに本部を置くコンサルタント会社グローバル・ポリシー・ソリューションセンターの2014年研究によると、アフリカ系市民の家計がもつ流動資産(容易に現金化可能な資産)の中間値は200ドルだ。ラテン系の場合は340ドル、白人系の場合は23,000ドルだ。この差の要因の一つには、すべての人種の女性、青年層を含めた非白人系の圧倒的多数が、圧倒的に、正式な退職金制度がある職場にほとんど、あるいはまったく就けないことだ。他の要因として、米国市民の多数が、特に非白人系市民が、住宅購入によって資産を保持するので、住宅ローン危機においてより手ひどく被害を受けたことにある。そういう意味では、2008年危機の救済策で、住宅ローン利用者よりも住宅金融会社の方に有利な政策を政府がとったことによって、非白人系よりも白人系市民を優遇することになった。

2043年には「マイノリティが多数を占めるようになる」というグローバル・ポリシー・ソリューションセンター長マヤ・ロッキーモアの意見は、国にとっては嬉しくないニュースだ。米国経済は未だ緩慢で危うい回復にとどまっている。低賃金や賃金低下のせいで購買意欲は低迷し、多くの市民の雇用が落ち込んでいることが、経済成長を微々たるものにしている背景にある、と多くのエコノミストが考えている。米国経済の70%が消費者の需要に支えられているとすれば、最終的には、貧富を問わずすべての市民の財布に影響する問題となる。

どうすればいいのか。底辺層の人たちと最富裕層の人たちとの格差を縮めることを真剣に考える必要がある。もしほとんどの人たちが、とりわけ低所得者層やマイノリティの人たちが、一握りの資産を住宅に投資し続けるのなら、融資業務を見直し、貸付基準(白人に有利になっている)の枠を広げ、良質な借り手に対する頭金を引き下げることを考えなければならない。退職制度の見直しも必要だ。早期退職優遇制度は主として白人や富裕層に効果がある。マイノリティや貧困層の家庭は、退職金制度が保障されている職場に就けるチャンスはあまりない。なぜなら彼らの多くが、レストランや子守りのように条件が整わない職場で働いているからだ。もう一つの要因は延び延びになっている改善策だ。富裕層の収入を他の人たちと同じように社会に還元するために、所得税の上限を引き上げ、社会保障制度を拡大すべきだ。

この二つの取り組みは、素晴らし最初の一歩になるだろう。しか前進していくためには、経済的平等と人種的平等がもはや別問題として考えることはできない。

inserted by FC2 system