2016年8月TIMEを読む会

Living Marriage How to Stay Married June 2, 2016 Matrimony is a very different game than it used to be. Staying with the same partner might require some baseline adjustments Lauren Fleishman

Matrimony is a very different game than it used to be. Staying with the same partner might require some baseline adjustments

Staying married is more challenging than ever. But new data says it's worth it

There’s a reason fairy tales always end in marriage. It’s because nobody wants to see what comes after. It’s too grim. Meeting the right person, working through comic misunderstandings and overcoming family disapproval to get to the altar

those are stories worth telling. Plodding on year after year with that same old soul

Yawnsville.

Most Americans of every stripe still want to get married

even millennials, although they’re waiting until they’re older. To aid them in their search, businesses have devoted billions of dollars and thousands of gigabytes to mate seeking. Lawyers have spent countless hours arguing that people should be able to marry whomever they choose, of any gender. Techies have refined recommendation engines so that people can more accurately find their perfect other half. In many ways, getting married is now easier than it has ever been.

But staying married, and doing so happily, is more difficult. In 2014, having spent a year looking at all the sociological, psychological, economic and historic data he could get his hands on, Northwestern University psychology professor Eli Finkel announced that marriage is currently both the most and the least satisfying the institution has ever been. “Americans today have elevated their e

pectations of marriage and can in fact achieve an unprecedentedly high level of marital quality,” he writes, but only if they invest a lot of effort. And if they can’t, their marriage will be more disappointing to them than a humdrum marriage was to prior generations, because they’ve been promised so much more.

Matrimony used to be an institution people entered out of custom, duty or a need to procreate. Now that it’s become a technology-assisted endeavor that has been delayed until conditions are at their most optimal, it needs to deliver better-quality benefits. More of us think this one relationship should

and could

provide the full buffet of satisfaction: intimacy, support, stability, happiness and se

ual e

hilaration. And if it’s not up to the task, it’s quicker and cheaper than ever to unsubscribe. It’s not clear any relationship could overcome that challenge.

It’s not even clear anymore e

actly what couples are signing up for. Marriage is the most basic and intimate of our social institutions, but also the one most subject to shifts in cultural, technological and economic forces, many of which have made single life a completely viable and attractive proposition.

At the same time, new evidence keeps piling up that few things are as good for life, limb and liquidity as staying married. “Couples who have made it all the way later into life have found it to be a peak e

perience, a sublime e

perience to be together,” says Karl Pillemer, a Cornell University gerontologist who did an intensive survey of 700 elderly people for his book 30 Lessons for Loving. “Everybody

100%

said at one point that the long marriage was the best thing in their lives.

“But all of them also either said that marriage is hard,” he adds, “or that it’s really, really hard.”

Marriage has become what game theorists call “a commitment device,” an undertaking that locks individuals into a course of action they might find dreary and inconvenient on occasion in order to help them achieve a worthwhile bonus later on. And in an era when it’s both harder and less necessary to stay together, the trick is figuring out how to go the distance so you can reap the surprisingly rich rewards.

What does a modern marriage promise that historical unions didn’t

The ultimate dream: a partner who sees what you really are and not only accepts it, but improves it. “The promise you make is not just to be faithful and true and to stay married, but to try and bring out the best in each other,” says Lisa Grunwald, who with her husband Stephen Adler put together a historical compendium of marriage, The Marriage Book, in 2015. “To try and understand, really deeply understand what the other one wants and hold her feet or his feet to the fire and say ‘O.K., this is great but remember, this is what you wanted and don’t let go of that dream.'”

And just as the benefits have changed, so have the challenges. The roles partners play in the home are a moving target. Child rearing has long been discounted as the main reason for marrying, and yet married couples today are encouraged to engage in it more intensively than before. Technology offers more enticements to stray while the culture and the law offer fewer penalties for doing so.

In some cases, the penalty is for staying. That Hillary Clinton stuck with a philandering husband is considered in some circles to be a liability, evidence of weakness or that the marriage is a sham. And when, in April, Beyonce dropped Lemonade, her gloriously enraged album about infidelity, many people assumed that as a feminist she would soon be single. Not so. “Today, choosing to stay when you can leave is the new shame,” says relationship therapist Esther Perel.

Beyonce has plenty of time to change her mind; “until death do us part” is a much longer stretch than it used to be. People can get married, have kids, put them through college, retire and still have decades of life together ahead of them. For some, that’s just way too much time with the one person with the one set of stories and gross habits. “Being married is like sharing a basement with a fellow hostage; after five years there are very few off-putting things you won’t know about each other,” writes Tim Dowling in How to Be a Husband. “After 10 years there are none.” After 25 years, he might have added, you’re ready to put their eyes out.

So while divorce rates have been dropping among all ages since the 1980s, there’s one e

ception: older people. Divorce rates among this group are up. A report in 2014 found it has doubled among people 50 and older in the past two decades; more men over 65 are divorced than widowed. Only a tenth of the people who divorced in 1990 were over 50. In 2010, it was 25%. Some of those were in second or third marriages, which tend to be less stable than the first, but more than half of them were first-timers.

Some demographers have hypothesized that the reason marriage is most popular among the highly educated is that they see it as the optimal way to give advantage to their offspring. Unhappy couples often split at a later stage because they’ve waited until their kids have left: the empty-nest divorce. But it may be that it was the demands of child rearing that first caused the rift. “If you look at time-use studies, all parents are spending more time with their children than parents with equivalent resources did decades ago,” says University of California at Santa Barbara demographer Shelly Lundberg. “And at the top end, among college graduates, we’re definitely at a new level.” Children are not merely fed, educated and sheltered; they are curated or, as family scholars put it, raised using “concerted cultivation.”

This intensive parenting is made more complicated when both spouses work outside the home, as more do than even 20 years ago. Since the child-care burden is still primarily shouldered by women, they are often the more stressed partner. In addition, their careers make it simpler for them to imagine a life without a spouse. They have their own income, a network of friends and associates and their own retirement savings.

And when people go home after work, their networks go with them. Social media has made it much easier to seek support and conversation elsewhere than in a spouse. Conveniently, it has also made it much easier to line up a new one if all that not talking takes a toll. “Man is basically as faithful as his options,” says noted marriage counselor Chris Rock. “No more, no less.” And now, people

of both se

es

feel like they have options to spare. They can find old flames easily. Or they can drop their lure into the vast schools of partners in online dating pools. Singledom looks less like murky waters and more like limpid ocean.

All of this would be academic, of course, without a reasonably unobstructed route to Splitsville. Divorce may feel like a failure but it has lost a lot of stigma, and hassle. Since 2010, every state in the nation has allowed people to leave their spouses without accusing them of anything

and in most states, it doesn’t even require their consent. Mediators are making divorce cheaper and less onerous. There are books, TV shows and websites dedicated to the once unthinkable concept of the good divorce, what practitioners Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin popularized as “conscious uncoupling.”

Lifetime monogamy, as many have pointed out, is not a natural state. Very few animals mate for life, and most of those that do are either birds or really ugly (Malagasy giant rat, anyone

). One theory as to why humans took to monogamy is that it strengthens societies by reducing competition among males.

But natural and worthwhile are not the same things. Reading isn’t a natural thing to do. Neither is painting, snowboarding nor coding. Nobody suggests we abandon any of those. Monogamy also has a certain energy-saving appeal: it saves humans from wasting time and effort on constantly hunting out new mates or recovering from betrayals by current ones.

Perhaps because fidelity is quite a challenge, cheating is less of a deal breaker than popularly imagined. “Surprisingly, a single episode of infidelity was not considered to be an automatic end” to the couples Pillemer interviewed, he says. “But there had to be reconciliation, remorse and often counseling.”

For those who can stay the course, indicators that a long marriage is worth the slog continue to mount. Studies suggest that married people have better health, wealth and even better se

lives than singles, and will probably die happier.

Most scholars agree that the beneficial health effects are robust: happily married people are less likely to have strokes, heart disease or depression, and they respond better to stress and heal more quickly. Mostly, the health effects apply only for happy marriages, but a study in May found that even a bad marriage was better for men with diabetes.

Some of this could be a result of selection bias: clinically depressed people and addicts find it difficult to get and stay married, so of course fewer married people are depressed or addicted. Some of it could be much more mundane; married people are more likely to behave responsibly about their health because their lives are more routine and other people need them. Bella DePaulo, a scientist at the University of California at Santa Barbara, argues that all studies of marriage are flawed: “If you want to say that getting married and staying married is better for your health than staying single,” she says, “then you need to compare the people who chose to stay married with those who chose to stay single. I don’t know of any studies that have done so.”

It’s also possible, researchers suggest, that individuals who share wealth and e

penses can afford better health care. The couple’s well-being might actually not be due to their marriage but because those whose finances are in order are more likely to get married in the first place.

Even so, married women’s finances are generally more robust than divorced women’s. “Historically, divorced women have had the highest poverty rates among all-aged women in the United States,” says Barbara Butrica, a labor economist at the Urban Institute.

Of course, money isn’t the only thing women need. There’s also se

. A 2011 Kinsey Institute study of se

ual satisfaction in the U.S., Germany, Spain, Brazil and Japan found that women in committed relationships were feeling more se

ually satisfied after 15 years than they were in the first decade and a half of the relationship. Another study found that people in their first marriages had more se

than people in their second.

John Gottman, one of the nation’s leading marriage researchers and educators, reports that older married couples tend to behave like younger married couples outside the bedroom too. “The surprising thing is that the longer people are together, the more the sense of kindness returns,” he says. “Our research is starting to reveal that in later life, your relationship becomes very much like it was during courtship.”

The biggest disincentive to divorce, however, may be the same as one of the biggest drivers of divorce: kids. Many sociologists and therapists agree that kids from what are known as “intact marriages,” as a whole, do better on most fronts than kids from divorced families, unless the marriage is very high-conflict. (It should be noted that therapists are clear that some marriages are just too to

ic to sustain, and if a spouse is in physical danger, he or she must leave.) Not all children of divorce are the walking wounded their whole lives, but the stats are not encouraging.

Research suggests that in the long term, children of divorced parents are more at risk of being poor, being unhealthy, having mental illness, not graduating college and getting divorced themselves. It’s true that being poor might be the cause of all the other adversities. Nevertheless, studies that have taken income into account still found that kids from divorced families face more challenges than those from parents who stayed married.

The things we don’t know about what keeps people together are legion. But here are some of the things we do know: if people get married after about the age of 26, have college degrees, haven’t already had kids or gotten pregnant, and are gainfully employed, they tend to stay married. If individuals form romantic partnerships with individuals who are similar to them in values and background, they find it easier to stay married. And the devout, by a slim but significant margin, get divorced slightly less often than people for whom faith is not a big deal.

But what’s the trick once you’re hitched

It’s hard to do thorough scientific testing of what actually makes a marriage work, because of the ethics of e

perimenting with people’s lives, but over the years, sociologists, psychologists and therapists have seen patterns emerging.

One constant is to avoid contempt at all costs. By contempt, therapists mean more than making derogatory remarks about a partner’s desirability or earning power. It’s also communicated by constant interruption, dismissal of their concerns or withdrawal from conversation.

Contempt, say therapists, sets off a lethal chain reaction. It kills vulnerability, among other things. Vulnerability is a prerequisite for intimacy. Without intimacy, commitment is a grind. And without commitment, the whole enterprise goes pear-shaped.

Alas, contempt’s favorite condition for breeding is familiarity. And you can’t have a family without familiarity.

How to avoid it

There are two main antidotes, says Gary Chapman, arguably the country’s most successful marriage therapist

his book The 5 Love Languages has been on some version of the New York Times best-seller list for eight straight years. The first, obvious as it sounds, is to figure out what specifically makes your partner feel loved. (According to Chapman, it’s probably one of five things: words, time, kindly acts, se

or gifts.) And the other is to learn to apologize

properly

and to forgive. Disagreements are inevitable and healthy, so learning to fight fair is essential; resentment is one of contempt’s chief co-conspirators.

Obvious idea that actually works No. 2 is to find shared interests, which can help offset the changes that relationships go through. “The most successful couples began to embrace one another’s interests,” says Pillemer. Since people are staying healthy longer, they can be active much longer. “We try to find everything we can think of that we really like to do together,” Jimmy Carter has said, and his 70-year marriage to Rosalynn endured four years in a governor’s mansion, one presidency, several failed campaigns and a passion for Trikkes, among other trials.

Another helpful adjustment is to drop the idea of finding a soul mate. “We have this mythological idea that we will find a soul mate and have these euphoric feelings forever,” says Chapman. In fact, soul mates tend to be crafted, not found. “There are tens of thousands of people out there that anyone could be happily married to,” says Gottman. “And each marriage would be different.”

And how do you make a soul mate

Practice, practice, practice. Pillemer observed that long-married couples he interviewed always acted as if divorce was not an option. “People really had the mind-set they wanted to stay married,” he says. They regarded their partnership as less like buying a new car and more like learning to drive. “Marriage is like a discipline,” he says. “A discipline is not reaching one happy endpoint.”

If all that discipline sounds a bit dreary, take heart, because the regimen includes bedroom calisthenics. A 2015 study found that se

once a week was the optimum amount for ma

imizing marital happiness. The Canadian researchers who analyzed data from three different studies found that se

played an even bigger role than money in happiness. The difference in life satisfaction between couples who had se

once a week and those who had it less than once a month was bigger than the difference between those who had an annual income of $50,000 to $75,000 and those who had an annual income between $15,000 and $25,000.

Se

, of course, does not occur in a vacuum (unless that’s the way both partners like it). Therapists urge couples not to let the kids keep them from going out. “It does not have to be huge swaths of time but bits or chunks,” says Scott Stanley, a co-director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies at the University of Denver. “Even something as simple as taking a walk together after dinner.” This is not time to work out differences. “When they should be in fun and friendship mode, [some people] switch into problem and conflict mode. Don’t mi

modes.”

One of the more controversial ideas therapists are now suggesting is that men need to do more of the “emotional labor” in a relationship

the work that goes into sustaining love, which usually falls to women. “What men do in a relationship is, by a large margin, the crucial factor that separates a great relationship from a failed one,” writes Gottman in his new book, The Man’s Guide to Women. “This doesn’t mean that a woman doesn’t need to do her part, but the data proves that a man’s actions are the key variable that determines whether a relationship succeeds or fails.”

Men are beginning to step up at home and value work-life balance almost as much as women. But recent scholarship has reinforced the value of old-school habits too

having family dinner and saying thank you actually make a difference.

The one piece of advice every e

pert and none

pert gives for staying married is perhaps the least useful one for those who are already several years in: choose well. The cascade of hormones that rains down on humans when they first fall in love, while completely necessary and wonderful, can sometimes blind individuals to their poor choices. Therapists suggest you ask friends about your prospective life mate and listen to them. Aim to find someone you know you’ll love even during the periods when you don’t like him or her so much.

And then, cross your fingers. As Grunwald puts it in an aphorism that may end up in a future marriage book: “Just pick out a good one and get lucky.”

This appears in the June 13, 2016 issue of TIME.

How to Stay Married
<結婚を持続する方法>
結婚を維持することが今までになく困難になっている。しかし最近のデータによると、結婚は維持するだけの価値がある、という。

おとぎ話はみんな結婚で終わるのには理由がある。結婚の後、何が待っているかなど誰も知りたくない。あまりにしんどすぎる。自分にピッタリの人と出会い、とんでもない勘違いや、家族の反対を乗り越えたりして結婚にたどり着く――このような話なら語るに値する。しかし、そんな風に一緒になった人であっても、くる年もくる年も、同じ顔と向き合って過ごす、これは語るに値するだろうか。退屈の一言だ。

米国市民のほとんどは、それでも結婚を望んでいる――結婚年齢が上がってはいるが、新世代の人たちも同じだ。結婚を仲介するビジネスは、何十億ドルもの資金をつぎ込んだり、何千ギガバイトものお見合いサイトを作ったりしている。好きな人と、相手が同性でも異性でも、結婚する権利のために、弁護士は果てしない時間を費やしてきた。利用者がより適切で、完璧な相手と巡り合えるように、ハイテク技術者は出会い系サイトを向上させてきた。いろんな意味で、結婚は今までよりずっと容易になった。

しかし結婚を維持することは、しかも幸せな結婚を維持することは、今までよりも難しくなっている。2014年にノースウェスタン大学心理学教授エイリ・フランケルは、入手できる限りの社会学的、心理学的、経済学的、歴史的データを1年がかりで分析して、結婚は現在、これまでの社会の中で最も満足できるものであるし、またその逆でもある、と発表した。「今日の米国市民は、結婚に対する期待を高くし、実際に今までにないほど高い質の結婚を手にできる」とエリは書き、それはただひたすら努力の結果なのだ、と言う。それが得られないときには、旧世代の単調な結婚よりもずっと不満足な結婚になるだろう。なぜなら、それだけ期待が大きいからだ。

これまでの結婚は、慣習や義務から、あるいは世代存続の必要から選び取る制度であった。今やテクノロジーにサポートされた婚活になり、自分が最適だと思う条件が整うまで待つことができるようになったので、結婚はより良質の恩恵をもたらすものでなければならない。より多くの人たちが、いったん決めたこの結合関係が、完全無欠の満足を与えるべきもの、また与えることができるものだと考える。その内実は、親密さ、支え、安定、幸福そして性的快感などだ。どれ一つでも欠けたりしたら、かつてなく手っ取り早く、安上がりに結婚を解消できる。どんな結婚がそれ程の難問を乗り越えられるのだろうか。

カップルが何のために結婚するのかさえ、もはや明確ではない。結婚は、我々の社会制度の中で最も基本的で親密なものだが、同時に、文化、テクノロジー、経済といった諸力の変化に左右される制度であり、その多くの変化が、一人暮らしを完全に可能で、魅力ある選択にしてしまった。

同時に、生活、身体、財産を考えれば、結婚を維持することほどいいことはない、と示す新しい資料がたくさん出てきている。「老いる時までずっと添い遂げるカップルは、一緒に過ごしたことが崇高で最高の経験だと気づくのです」とコーネル大学老人学者で、「愛するための30カ条の教訓」のために700人の高齢者を対象に綿密な調査を行ったカール・ピルマーは言う。「誰もがみな100%、ある点で同じことを言います。長く続く結婚は人生で最高のものだ、と」

「しかしまた、そう言う人たちが口を揃えて、結婚は厳しいものだと言うのです」と付け加える。「本当に厳しいです」と。

結婚は、ゲーム理論家が言うところの「覚悟を伴うデバイス(a commitment device)」だ。つまり後になって、努力に値するご褒美を手にすることを可能にするために、時には退屈で不便に感じるかもしれない連綿と繰り返される日々に、人を縛り付ける契約だ。一緒にいるのがしんどくて、それほど互いを必要としない時期には、長い道のりをいかに歩んでいけばいいかをこの契約がおのずと解き明かし、驚くほど豊かな褒美を得ることができるのだ。

現代の結婚は、今までの結婚にはなかった、どんなものを約束するのだろうか。夢の極みは、本当の自分を理解し、ありのままの自分を受け入れるだけでなく、さらに向上させてくれるパートナーだ。「あなたが交わす約束は、忠実で、真摯であること、そして結婚を維持するというだけでなく、互いに最善を尽くし、長所を育みあうことです」と2015年に結婚史概要「結婚について」を夫のステファン・アドラーと共著したリサ・グランワルドは言う。「努力し、相手が望んでいることを理解し、本当に深く理解し、頑張るように説得し、いいよ、素晴らしい、でも覚えておいて、それはあなたが望んだことだし、その夢を諦めてはいけない、と言うのです」

そして結婚の恩恵が変化するにつれて、困難も変化してきた。家庭内でのパートナーの役割は変化していく目標だ。長い間、子育てが結婚の主たる理由であることに異議ありとされてきたが、それでも既婚のカップルは、以前にもまして子育てに深く関わるようにと迫られている。テクノロジーはますます目移りするように誘惑をまき散らし、一方で文化や法律は、結婚生活を逸脱してもさして罰則を加えない。

いくつかの事例を見ると、むしろ結婚生活を続けることに対してペナルティを課している。女たらしの夫に執着しているヒラリー・クリントンは軟弱だとか、二人の結婚は偽善だとか、ある部分からマイナス評価をされている。また4月に、ビヨンセが見事なまでにその怒りを表現したアルバム「レモネード」を発表した時、フェミニストのビヨンセならすぐに離婚する、と予想した。でもいまだにしない。「現代では、離婚できるのにしないのは、今風の恥なのです」と結婚セラピスト、エスター・ペレルは言う。

ビヨンセはそのうちに心変わりするかもしれない。「死が二人を分かつまで」は、かつてよりもずっと長い期間を意味する。結婚して、子供をもって、大学にやり、退職して、その先何十年も一緒に過ごす時間が残されている。中には、あまりに長すぎる時間を、同じ相手と顔を突き合わせて、二人一組で同じ人生を歩み、嫌な癖を我慢する一つの方法に過ぎない、と考える人もいる。「結婚生活は、まるで地下の一室で、他の捕虜と一緒に暮らすようなものです」5年後は、お互いにまだ知らない嫌なところがほんの少しあるでしょう」と「良き夫であるために」を書いたティム・ドーリングは言う。「10年経てば、すべて知り尽くしてしまいます。そして25年後には、もう相手を見たくなくなります」

だから、離婚率は1980年代以降下降しているものの、ただ1つ例外がある。熟年者カップルだ。この年齢層の離婚率が上昇しているのだ。2014年の報告では、過去20年で50歳以上の離婚率が倍になったという。65歳以上の男性では、死別よりも離婚の方が多い。1990年に離婚した人の10%が50歳を超えていた。2010年は25%だった。その中には2度目や3度目の結婚の人もいて、初婚よりも安定性に欠ける傾向が見えたが、半数以上は初婚だった。

高学歴の人たちの間で結婚が一般的な理由は、子供にとって両親の結婚が有利になると考えるからだ、と推測する人口統計学者もいる。不幸せな夫婦は、子供が親離れするまで離婚を遅らせる場合が多い。子離れ離婚(empty-nest divorce)だ。しかし子育ての負担が不和を引き起こすきっかけになる場合もある。「同じ統計データで時間配分を比較すれば、すべての親が数十年前よりも子供と多くの時間を過ごしています」とカリフォルニア大学サンタバーバラ校の人口統計学者シェリー・ルンドバーグは言う。「そしてその頂点では、大卒者の中で、明らかに新たなレベルに達しています」子供たちは単に食事を提供され、教育を受け、保護されるだけではない。彼らは監督教育されている、つまり家族学者がいうところの「協同教育」で育てられている。

このような集中的子育ては、両親が共働きで家にいない時、さらに複雑になる。20年前でもそれほどではなかった。今でも子育ての負担が女性にかかっているので、女性のストレスはさらに大きくなる。その上に、仕事を持っていると、相手がいない方が人生はずっと簡単に思えてくる。自分の収入があり、友人やグループのネットワークを持ち、退職後の蓄えもある。

また仕事が終わって帰宅した時、そんなネットワークが待っている。伴侶がいなくてもソーシャル・メディアがあれば、支援や会話を求めるのがずっと簡単になった。便利なことに、会話が負担でなければ、ネットワークを使って新しい相手を見つけるがずっと簡単になった。「基本的に男性というものは、自分の選んだ女性が忠実な分だけ忠実になる」とちょっとした結婚カウンセラー気取りのクリス・ロックは言う。「無難な程度にね」そして今、男女ともに、十分な選択肢があると感じている。簡単に昔の恋人を見つけることができる。あるいは出会い系サイトで、無数の相手に食指を伸ばすこともできる。独り者はさほど暗澹たる状態ではなく、むしろ透明な海原のように思える。

今述べたすべては勿論、合理的で妨害のない離婚への道がなければ空論に終わるだろう。離婚は失敗のように感じるかもしれないが、むしろ多くの傷やストレスを解消してくれる。2010年以降、米国全州で、相手に非がなくても別れることができる――ほとんどの州では、相手の同意すら不必要になった。仲介者は、離婚の費用も手間も省いてくれる。かつてなら考えられなかったような離婚は素晴らしいという概念を、書物やテレビ番組やウエブサイトが教えている。例えばグィネス・パルトローとクリス・マーチンの言葉で有名になった「意識的脱夫婦(conscious uncoupling)」宣言だ。

一生涯同じ伴侶と暮らすことは、多くの人が指摘するように、不自然だ。一生を伴にする動物は稀であり、そんな動物のほとんどが鳥類か実にみっともない動物だ(例えばマダガスカル大ネズミ)。人間がなぜ一夫一婦制をとるかには、オスの競争を抑制して社会を堅持するためだという説がある。

しかし自然の摂理と価値とは別物だ。読書は天然の行為ではない。絵画、スノーボード、コード化も天然の行為ではない。誰もこのような行為を放棄しようとは言わない。また単婚制はエネルギーの節約という利点がある。絶えず次の相手を探したり、今の相手の裏切りから立ち直ったりする時間と労力を節約できる。

おそらくは貞節がかなり難しいことだから、一般に考えられているほど裏切り行為が破綻に結びつかないのだ。驚いたことに、ピレマーがインタビューした夫婦にとって「一回の浮気で即離婚になるとは考えられなかった」という。「しかしそのためには、和解、反省、そして多くの場合にカウンセリングが必要だった」

結婚にとどまるカップルにとって、長い結婚には長くて辛い道を歩んでいくだけの価値がある、という指標は増え続けている。研究によれば、独身よりも既婚者の方が健康で、裕福で、性生活も豊かで、おそらく幸せな最期を迎えるだろう、という。

(結婚が)健康にかなり有益だという説にはほとんどの研究者が同意する。幸福な結婚生活を送る人たちは、発作、心臓疾患、鬱にかかりにくく、ストレスに上手く対応できるし、立ち直りも早い。多くの場合、健康への効果はただ幸福な結婚にのみ言えることだが、不幸な結婚生活であっても、糖尿病を患う男性にはいい効果がある、と5月に出された研究は報告している。

この研究には幾分、偏ったデータに依拠した故の結果が見られる。病的鬱状態や中毒症状の人たちは、そもそも結婚したり結婚を維持したりすることが困難であり、当然にも既婚者には鬱や中毒症状が少ない。研究結果の中にはごく平凡なことが言われている。例えば、既婚のカップルはより健康を気遣って行動するが、それは彼らの生活が日々安定していて、家族が彼らを必要としているからだ。カリフォルニア大学サンタバーバラ校の研究者ベラ・デパウロは、結婚に関するすべての研究は不完全だ、と言う。「もし結婚して、結婚を維持していることが、一人でいるよりも健康にいいと言いたいなら、結婚を維持している人と独身を続けている人を比較しなければならない。そんな研究はないでしょう」

研究者たちはまた、財産と出費を共有している人たちは、より医療に費やす余裕があるかもしれない、と結論する。夫婦の財政の豊かさは結婚に帰するのではなく、財政状態が健全な人たちは、実際にまず結婚する可能性が高いことが理由かもしれない。

そうだとしても、既婚女性の方が一般的に離婚した女性よりも財政的に堅固だ。「歴史的に見て、米国のすべての年代で、離婚女性の貧困率が最も高いのです」とアーバン・インスティチュートの労働経済学者バーバラ・ブトリカは言う。

勿論、女性が必要とするのは金銭だけではない。性関係も然りだ。キンゼイ研究所の2011年米国、ドイツ、スペイン、ブラジル、日本における性的満足度に関する研究は、最初の15年よりもその後に、妻はより性的満足を得られる、という。別の報告では、初婚カップルは再婚カップルよりもセックスの回数が多いという。

米国の結婚調査及び結婚教育の第一人者であるジョン・ゴットマンは、熟年夫婦は寝室の外でも、まるで若い夫婦のように行動する傾向にある、と言う。「驚いたことに、一緒に過ごすほどに、人は優しさが戻って来るのです」と言う。「人生の熟年期に入ると、まさに交際時期のような関係になってきます」

離婚を思いとどまる最大の要素は、しかしながら、離婚を促す最大の要素でもある。子供だ。ひどい争いが絶えない家庭でない限り、いわゆる「ひび割れのない家庭」の子供は、離婚家庭の子供よりもほとんどにおいてうまくいく、ということに対して多くの社会学者やセラピストが同意する。(あまりにひどくてもはや結婚を維持できないし、もし相手からの肉体的暴力を受ける恐れがある時には、離婚すべきだ、とセラピストは明快にしていることは注目に値するだろう)離婚家庭のすべての子供が一生涯、精神的な傷を背負って生きていくわけではないが、統計では好ましい傾向を示していない。

長期的に見れば、離婚家庭の子供は、貧困、健康上の問題、精神疾患、大学を卒業しないなどのリスクが比較的大きく、子供自身も離婚する場合がより多い。貧困が他のすべての諸問題を引き起こしていることは事実だ。しかしながら、収入を考慮に入れた研究では、離婚家庭の子供は、離婚していない両親を持つ子供よりも多くの問題を抱えている。

なぜ人は結婚を続けるのかについて、わからないことがいろいろある。しかし明らかになっていることもある。26歳後に結婚した場合、大卒で、子供がいなくて、妊娠もしていなくて、有給職に就いているなら、離婚しない確率が高い。価値観や背景がよく似た条件の人と恋人関係にあるなら、結婚生活を続けることは容易だ。信心深い人は、宗教を重要視しない人よりも離婚する場合がやや少なく、その差はわずかだが重要だ。

しかし、いったん結婚した場合に、長続きさせるコツは何だろう。実際に結婚をうまくいかせる要素を科学的に十分研究することは難しく、それは人の一生を実験することが倫理的に問題であるがゆえだが、何年にもわたって、社会学者や心理学者、そしてセラピストが、そこに一定のパターンを見てきた。

一つのパターンは、何としても軽蔑を避けることだ。セラピストによると、相手の人物像や甲斐性について見下したような発言をする以上に、軽蔑は大きな意味を持つとセラピストは言う。常に妨害したり、心配をはねつけたり、会話を避けたりすることによって、軽蔑は表面化する。

セラピストによれば、軽蔑によって破滅的な連鎖反応が始まる。何よりもか弱さを消してしまう。か弱さは親密さを増すためには必要な要素だ。親密さがなければ、互いの関係に対する責任はつまらないものになってしまう。関係に対する責任がなければ、何をしてもうまくいかない。

(途中です)

inserted by FC2 system